Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘John Scofield’

Soulive: Photograph Courtesy of Calabro Music

Soulive: Photograph Courtesy of Calabro Music

Bowlive V: Night IV – Soulive feat. Jon Cleary and John Scofield @ The Brooklyn Bowl (03.18.14)

As the members of Soulive settled in over the years, their Brooklyn Bowl based annual residency, Bowlive, has became as institutional as the music itself. During the first week, the audience was privileged enough to enjoy the musical styling of vocalists Nigel Hall and Nicki Bluhm, turntablist DJ Logic, rocking guitarists Warren Haynes and Eddie Roberts, legendary bassist George Porter, Jr., and house band, The Shady Horns. Full band performances and collaborations by Leroy Justice and The London Souls added to the marvel. Every song sailed down the middle of the stage, rolled by the trio with the consistency of a pro bowler. This consistency, of course, has been the key to Soulive’s longevity.

“When Soulive hit the stage, I was surprised at how they constantly matched the energy from the previous nights. I’m always reminded of the 80’s power trio bands that filled a room with just three musicians and am amazed how these guys do it. A modern day jazz/funk power trio like no other.” ~ R.G.

Commencing with their second week of Bowlive V, Neal Evans, Alan Evans and Eric Krasno have put together another long list of talented musicians to keep us satiated for the remaining five nights. Over the next few evenings our musical senses will be overloaded with the likes of Joe Russo, Susan Tedeschi, Jon Cleary, Bill Evans, Alan Evans Trio, DMC (of Run DMC), Marco Benevento, Sonya Kitchell, and WOLF! Featuring Scott Metzger. You can also count on some surprise guests.

For night IV, Soulive made all the right moves, showering the audience in musical genius, making sure no one would regret coming out on a Tuesday night. With Jon Cleary and John Scofield as the special guests last night, it was the perfect kick-off for the second week. And what a kick-off it was. It was truly stimulating. Soulive and their guests performed one long extended set with Jon Cleary opening to a packed house at 8:30pm.

“Notes from the front line, my first encounter with Bowlive! Thank you Soulive and Brooklyn Bowl for making our first Brooklyn Bowl/Bowlive experience a very memorable one. From the moment we arrived, we were welcomed by the staff and had a great pre-show dinner, followed by the acquisition of the highly coveted John Warner Bowlive poster, which are limited to 15 posters per evening. After seeing some fellow Pittsburghers and Jam Cruisers, we secured our spots on the platform area with a killer view of the stage.” ~ M.M & L.M.

Jon Cleary Set
Unknown
I Feel So Damn Good I’ll Be Glad When I Get the Blues
Cheating On You
When You Get Back, We Gonna Cha Cha All Night Long
The Crave (an emotionally complex piece.)
I Get The Blues When It Rains
Unknown (Boogie Woogie Tune)

Phone Capture Courtesy By Rob Mishaan

Phone Capture Courtesy By Rob Mishaan

The venue was packed with devoted music fans. This wasn’t your average audience who was there to drink and chat it up with their friends. Almost every eye was fixated on the stage as Jon Cleary opened the night with a solo piano set showcasing his vested studies in the music of New Orleans. Having moved from Kent, England to study the music of New Orleans, Jon Cleary is arguably the best out there right now. A disciple of Professor Long Hair and James Booker, Cleary’s voice is salty-sweet and he is a master of the piano, organ and guitar. You may know him best as a member of Bonnie Raitt and Taj Mahal‘s bands and his own group, Jon Cleary & the Absolute Monster Gentlemen. With his blend of jazz, blues, soul, gospel, and honky-tonk, Cleary epitomizes New Orleans music. His set was evidence of his extreme caliber of musical knowledge.

Jon Cleary started the night of music off right, as I was immediately intrigued by his silky smooth voice and Deniro-esque looks. His “Big Easy” style was quite a cover for his British heritage. This new musical discovery for me had me Googling his discography this morning to see what else I could find out about this man!” ~ M.M. & L.M.

“Having just booked our trip to Nola for jazziest the night before I could not have asked for a better punctuation. Watching Jon Cleary play keys in such classic New Orleans style blew us away. I could only wonder if Neal Evans was peeking down the stairs to watch this guy.” ~ R.G.

Set I
Shaheed
Come Together
One in 7
For Granted
Cannonball
What You See Is What You Get
Nealization
Something’s Got A Hold on Me
Motherless Child
Walk With Me
Don’t Need No Doctor
Turn It Out
Hottentot

Encore: Get Back

Last night, there wasn’t three sets or even two sets, there was one long extended set which ended promptly at midnight. Soulive, The Shady HornsJon Cleary and John Scofield would command the stage with various genres of blues and jazz, filling every second of the evening with prodigious music. The set started out with the members of Soulive performing “Shaheed,” The Beatles‘ tune, “Come Together,” and “One in 7.” During “Come Together,” the audience sang along with heads bobbing and the stage lights flashing, while “One in 7” was played with a delightful intro. It was also during this time that there was some malfunction with Neal’s keyboards. Times like these can break a musical moment but Alan Evans picked up the slack by drumming his heart out while the chords on his brother’s rig were being fixed. When the audience heard the rejuvenation of the bass keys, it was on!

“Upon completion of Jon Cleary‘s set, Soulive took the stage, embracing me with their soul soothing sounds and reminding me that Neal Evans is a true bad-ass! Watching him lay down those bass lines with his left hand as his right hand plays the Hammond chords was literal music to my ears! The Beatles‘ cover “Come Together” got the crowd singing along, but you could see the anxious anticipation for the arrival of John Scofield, who was the special guest of the evening. Having the pleasure of watching such musical prowess and interplay in such close proximity was truly a treat.” ~ M.M.

“For Granted” and “Cannonball” were both played with the help of The Shady Horns. Ryan Zoidis (baritone/alto saxophone), Eric “Benny” Bloom (trumpet) and James Casey (alto saxophone/percussion) always bring a special vibe to the stage when they join Soulive. As much as they is a respected jazz trio, their vested interest in funk runs deep. The audience is blessed to have a horn ensemble in the mix of some of their favorite jazz tunes. “For Granted” was a wonderful showcase for the widely talented Ryan Zoidis, while James Casey absolutely stole the show with his performance on “Cannonball.” Eric Bloom took his liberties with his pedals and effects during his solo, as well.  These two songs were meant to showcase The Shady Horns and boy, did they deliver.

The Shady Horns were dead on, once again. Eric Bloom‘s effects-enhanced solos and James Casey killed it, as always, while Ryan continues to be the mainstay. Gonna get some more rest today so I can get back there tonight with Tedeschi!!!” ~ R.G.

The eyes say so much, and they speak even louder when a musician closes his eyes and is fully immersed in song. This happened to Krasno throughout the remainder of the set. When Scofield came on the stage, Krasno was in a blissed-out state of being, eyes closed, in total focus. “What You See Is What You Get,” a major hit for the Dramatics in 1971, is Scofield’s interpretation of Detroit soul music.  The beautiful thing about John Scofield is that even though he covers many old tunes, the arrangements are all his own. “Nealization,” obviously composed by Neal Evans, was a fantastic representation of his talent. Scofield played lead guitar while Krasno played rhythm. The entire crew on stage was grinning from ear to ear while the ax-men played off each other, trading delicious licks on their guitars.

“I have been a fan of John Scofield since the first time I saw him at The Bottom Line in NYC in 1980. I always mark this night as a must go. Even having stayed home from work sick, I got the energy up to get there. I was not disappointed!!! It is so obvious that Kraz uses Sco as a mentor and has used him as one of his many inspirations. As it is equally obvious how Sco is impressed with Kraz. There dueling solos blew the entire audience away. Sco has a way of making his guitar sing.” ~ R.G.

“Can someone explain to me how Neal Evans solos on keys with Soulive while also dropping funky bass? Meanwhile, I can’t even rub my tummy and tap my head at the same time…” ~ K.S.

“Neal Evans is the most underrated bass player in music. His right hand gets so funky, we forget his left is leading us to the promise land.” ~ J.S.

The next two songs were songs off John Scofield‘s latest album release, Piety Street. The Rev. James Cleveland cover, “Something’s Got A Hold On Me,” was first but it was “Motherless Child,” a traditional negro spiritual born out of slavery and sung by Cleary with sharp new harmonies, that grabbed the audience’s attention. 

“When I heard “Motherless Child,” I almost didn’t recognize it. I recognized that I was hearing the words of a song I knew but the arrangement was so different from the versions I’d previously heard.  I am aging myself by saying this but I remember the first time I ever heard that song. I was just 15 years old. It is the hidden song within Track 11 off the Cracked Rear View album by Hootie and The Blowfish. Y’all remember that? Darius Rucker sings the song in it’s traditional A-Capella style. It was as beautiful to back then as it was now, hearing it in this new style and arrangement. I adore when modern musicians take classic songs and make them their own.” ~ K.D.

“One of my favorite moments of the evening, was when the stage was packed with everyone on the bill, Soulive, The Shady Horns, Scofield and Clearly as they played a tune that featured three part harmonies of Alan EvansJon Cleary and Eric “Benny” Bloom. I look forward to finding that show on Archive.org to relive that moment and sing along with them!” ~ M.M.

Photo Courtesy of Mark Dershowitz

Photo Courtesy of Mark Dershowitz

Then, the jazz/organ trio pulled a new maneuver out of their Bowlive bag of tricks. Jon Cleary and John Scofield remained on stage, while Soulive and The Shady Horns exited. This would be the first time in Bowlive history where the band allowed the stage to be commanded solely by the guests. It was not a coincidence that Jon Cleary and John Scofield were the two guests playing on the bill last night. Cleary is not only renowned for his ability to play the ivories, but he also composes music and went on to write and join John Scofield on the the road singing and playing with Scofield’s Piety Street Band. Needless to say, the combination of the two artists performing their song, “Walk With Me,” was electrifying and unique. Cleary sat back and watched as Scofield took a few measures for himself before joining in the song.

Through great applause, John Scofield leaned into the microphone. Referring to Cleary, he says, “This guy can play a mean piano but did you know he is an amazing guitarist, as well?” With that, Cleary jumped from the keys and moved to guitar while Krasno picked up the bass for “Don’t Need No Doctor.” Scofield continued, “John Mayer used to sing this song, but you should hear Cleary sing this song.” The audience laughed. The horns had left the stage but James Casey remained playing percussion. Casey is an amazing horn player but his talent by way of understanding sounds in percussion has grown exponentially since we saw him last year at Bowlive IV.  During the song, Scofield could be seen bouncing around, pointing to the next member on stage he wanted to pull a solo.

“I want to say that my highlight was “What You See Is What You Get,” “Nealization” or “Hottentot,” but honestly I had two highlights. (1) Cleary killing it on guitar with Kraz killing it on Bass, and (2) Scofield directing traffic. Maybe it’s an elder statesman thing, but the respect that guy engenders on stage is impressive. He was absolutely in charge and was clearly enjoying going tit for tat with everyone. I especially loved when [John Scofield] made a point to give Alan some play time, because, give the drummer some! Am I right? All in all, just a beast of a show. I fucking love Bowlive.”  ~ B.M.

Jon Cleary‘s turn was up and he retired backstage. The Shady Horns were also held back as Soulive and John Scofield played, “Turn It Out.” This was the time for all the jazz heads to revel in the genre. As much as Soulive likes to give us the funk, jazz is their priority and their growing reputation on this musical path is what has brought them this far. Scofield’s reputation in the Jazz community runs deeper and Krasno’s idolization of Scofield’s style is evident in how Krasno, himself, plays. So you can imagine how equally graceful and intense this part of the set was.

“Seeing two guitar gods trade licks was invigorating, and truly impressive at the same time, as you could see the admiration that Krasno has for Scofield as they both played their hearts out! It was ON, for sure!! “Turn It Out” brought back some great musical memories for me, as I harkened back to a January 2003 Soulive show that took place in an Italian restaurant in the tiny mountain town of Makawao, HI on the island of Maui. It reinforced the fact that we made a great decision to make the trek for our first Bowlive and it’s got me jazzed looking forward to what I’ll get to experience tonight! Thank you Eric, Alan and Neal!! You and your friends bring me musical delight!” ~ M.M.

We love you madly,” said Scofield, “This one is a groover, called ‘Hottentot,’ so let’s keep dancing.” And dance we did. The venue never emptied out like in previous nights and this was a true testament to the musicianship on stage. Like I mentioned previously, this wasn’t your average audience of bar goers. There were super fans in the audience for each of the artists on stage and they were there in full support all night. Alan Evans was featured on a rousing drum solo during “Hottentot.”  He is honestly one of the best jazz drummers around and the audience was overheard speaking on how they were looking forward to the Alan Evans Trio opening for Bowlive on night six.

Everyone was brought back on stage for the single-song encore, “Get Back.” A Beatles‘ tune, it was expertly played by the musicians on stage, having all worshiped the Beatles at some point in their musical careers.  The audience was invested as well and sang along with bodies bouncing. It was a perfect ending to a wonderful collaboration of musicians.

——————————

Tonight, Jon Cleary will return with special guests jazz saxophonist Bill Evans, acclaimed Brooklyn drummer Joe Russo and southern vocalist and guitarist Susan Tedeschi. 

——————————

List of Special Guests and Openers:

THURSDAY MARCH 13 – Special Guest: NIGEL HALL, EDDIE ROBERTS, more TBA

FRIDAY MARCH 14 – Special Guests: GEORGE PORTER JR. & SPECIAL GUESTS TBA
Opener: LEROY JUSTICE

SATURDAY MARCH 15 – Special Guest: GEORGE PORTER JR. feat. a special LONDON SOULIVE joint set
Opener: THE LONDON SOULS

TUESDAY MARCH 18 – Special Guest: JOHN SCOFIELD
Opener & Special Guest: JON CLEARY

WEDNESAY MARCH 19 – Special Guests: JOE RUSSO & SUSAN TEDESCHI
Opener & Special Guest: JON CLEARY

THURSDAY MARCH 20 – Special Guest: DMC (of RUN DMC) and TALIB KWELI
Opener: ALAN EVANS TRIO

FRIDAY MARCH 21 – Special Guest: Marco Benevento, Sonya Kitchell, Roosevelt Collier, Felix Pastorius, Oteil & Kofi Burbridge, and Brandon Niederauer
Opener: SONYA KITCHELL

SATURDAY MARCH 22 – Special Guest: Bill Evans and more TBA
Opener: WOLF! Featuring Scott Metzger

Read Full Post »

Bowlive III: Night Ten – Finale Recap for Soulive w/ Ledisi, Derek Trucks and The London Souls ~ Extended Review + Media (03.10.12)

After nine nights of warming up, Soulive members Eric KransoNeal Evans and Alan Evans tore the roof off the Brooklyn Bowl Saturday night for the final night of their 3rd annual ten-night residency, Bowlive. Over the course of the last two weeks, Soulive presented their audience with talented guests from across the musical spectrum. Virtuoso guitarists such as jazz legend John Scofield, southern blues rocker Luther Dickinson (North Mississippi Allstars), and the hard-bopping Warner Brothers artist Mark Whitfield created slaying duets with guitarist Eric Krasno. Renowned bassists Oteil Burbridge (The Allman Brothers Band) and George Porter, Jr. (The Meters) rocked the stage, adding to the cool bass keys Neal Evans plays so strikingly. Hip-hop drummer ?uestlove (The Roots), experimental percussionist Billy Martin (MMW) and world beat drummer Luke Quaranta took their turns leading the rhythm when the smoother than smooth Soulive drummer Alan Evans stepped aside to play rhythm guitar.

Guest vocalists Nigel Hall, Allen Stone, Jennifer Hartswick and Alecia Chakour brought their own style of strength and soul to the mic, Citizen Cope and Alice Smith sang an eclectic mix of blues, laid-back rock and folk while Rhazel and Ledisi delivered beat boxing and R&B/Soul into the eager ears of their audience. As well, for two night and two full sets, Royal Family recordings artists Lettuce, consisting of guitarist Adam Smirnoff, drummer Adam Deitch (Break Science), bassist ED “Jesus” Coomes, and The Bowlive horns, seared the stage with their urban funk flavor.

The Bowlive Horns, consisting of saxophonist James Casey, trumpeters Eric Bloom and Matt Owens and tenor saxophonist Ryan Zoidis were joined over the course of the run by numerous big name brass players.  Trombonist Sam “Big Sam” Williams (Big Sam’s Funky Nation), flautist/saxophonist Karl Denson (Karl Denson’s Tiny Universe), trumpeters Rashawn Ross (Dave Matthews Band) and Jennifer Hartswick, flautist Kofi Burbrudge (Derek Trucks Band) and wild improvisational saxophonist Skerik, rotated throughout the ten nights creating one of the sickest brass ensembles some have ever seen.

Other surprise guests included virtuoso pianist Eldar and organist Mitch Chakour while DJ Wyllys spun the ones and twos in between the weekend sets. When Soulive didn’t open the show themselves, the one man band, Zach Deputy, Royal Family recording artists The Nigel Hall Band, The Alecia Chakour Band and The London Souls amped the energy of the evening before Soulive took over to lay devastation upon the stage. It has been a two week rage of full on face melting, mind warping, soul filling, gut busting musicianship that accelerated with power each night and with audience members wondering how it could be topped.

Saturday night was the tenth and last night of Bowlive III. The audience, clad in white outfits for the evening’s White-Out Party theme, could be heard whispering their ideas of who the special guests might be. The London Souls, Ledisi and The Royal Family All-Stars were billed which could only mean that a surprise that couldn’t be named was being prepared.

The London Souls opened the evening with their Hendrix-style rock and roll sound. It is quite impossible to remain calm when guitarist Tash Neal, bassist Stu Mahan, and drummer Chris St. Hilaire are slamming away on their instruments.  The perfect opening for the end of a great run.

Soulive’s set started off with the super horn heavy, high-energy “El Ron”  However, during “Upright,” some unexpected technical difficulty occurred.  What could have been a rough moment turned into something special. There was three minutes where Alan Evans and his team worked at lightning speed to repair a broken drum head while the remaining members on stage worked together to keep the audience engaged. The audience clapped and cheered, supporting their favorite trio because there was importance in this moment. The band’s talent was exposed so much more during this time as they kept it together. The power from the applause in the audience when Evans’ silver shimmering drum kit was finally lifted in the air and put back in place was outstanding. It was a killer moment in rock n roll, a killer moment in Bowlive History. The trio ripped into the end of “Upright” and kept the momentum UP, UP, UP! They rolled through “Tuesday Night Squad” and Nigel Hall sang on the lively “Too Much” and the beautifully arranged “Everybody Wants to Rule the World” by Tears For Fears that segued into Bobby Caldwell’s “Open Your Eyes.”

When Ledisi was brought back on stage for the second night, the crowd exploded. Her R&B flavor had brought such joy to the previous night’s performance and we wanted more. Singing “Love Never Changes” off her Turn Me Loose album, Ledisi unleashed her massively powerful voice upon the audience. Her range and strength were unbelievable as she swiftly scatted her way through “Them Changes,” a Buddy Miles cover off of Jimi Hendrix’s Band of Gypsys. Tash Neal also performed on this song where he and Krasno playfully raged a duet to end the set.

The second set began as multiple white balloons were tossed out into the audience while Soulive played “One in Seven.” The second technical difficulty of the night occurred as Neal Evans’ clavinet finally gave way after nine nights of solid pounding. Not to miss a beat, Alan Evans began jamming on his kit, delivering a tight an extended drum solo as the back line team fixed the issue.  It was then time for some Beatles love as they played an electric run of “Eleanor Rigby,” “She’s So Heavy” and “Get Back.”

Finally, the last surprise guest of this amazing musical journey was invited on the stage. Southern rock, slide guitarist Derek Trucks (The Allman Brothers Band) walked out on stage with Nigel Hall and Ledisi to perform Sam Cooke’s Civil Rights Era anthem “A Change Gonna Come,”. It was no wonder that while Ledisi and Hall sang with all their passion and Derek Trucks made his guitar cry, audience members began to weep where they stood. The meaning and epic delivery of this song wasn’t lost on a single soul. Soulive flipped the emotional script by following Cooke’s song with the raging Jimi Hendrix’s tune, “Manic Depression!” Derek Trucks, Eric Krasno, Neal Evans and Alan Evans delivered a sick rendition of the song with Trucks and Krasno playing off each other and Trucks taking a ripping solo to end the set.

Before the encore, Brooklyn Bowl owner, Pete Shapiro, came on stage with Rosemary and Lavender plants in his hands. He explained that everyone on the floor was to take a piece of the plants being passed around the audience in hopes that the aroma therapy would help us gather our strength for one last song. Ending their epic ten night run the way they began, our favorite trio, just the three of them, took the stage for “Aladdin.”

Bowlive III is now over, leaving some New Yorkers wondering what to do with themselves.  For two weeks, dedicated fans came to the Brooklyn Bowl to see Neal Evans, Alan Evans and Eric Krasno play their hearts out, touching on every musical genre and playing with many of Americas most talented musicians. Let us give thanks to Soulive for the dedication to their craft and their ability to express it through the creative outlet that is Bowlive. Thanks for their want to educate us on new talent, their need to put new twists on old classics, and their determination to raise the bar each and every night.

Let us give thanks to The Brooklyn Bowl, because without them there would be no Bowlive. Thanks for their wonderful environment, staff and treatment.  For the last 2 weeks the Brooklyn Bowl has been our community’s second home. We’ve feasted on their fantastic Blue Ribbon cuisine, felt at home on their plush leather couches and enjoyed their attentive staff.   Soulive + The Brooklyn Bowl = Bowlive and don’t you forget it!

A change has come to New York City. A change has come to the music community.  Soulive has created something so special in Bowlive.  There is nothing else like it in our scene and it’s through that unique way of doing things that Soulive will remain one of the most influential groups in our music community. Bowlive is the development of a passionate dream that is now reality. After three years, Bowlive is no-doubt a game changer in the music community and will continue to be for many years to come. Thank you Soulive!

 Karen E. Dugan
– Photo courtesy of Phrazz

Youtube Videos

Read Full Post »

Soulive members, the rhythmic Evans brothers Neal and Alan and guitarist Eric Krasno transformed The Brooklyn Bowl from a guitar god’s wet dream to a world of funk and Beatle Mania on the third night of Bowlive III.

However, before the show could start, there were a few adventures I went on that I would like to share.  The most silly adventure was first. On Jam Cruise this year, a girl named Harmony held a pet adoption with stuffed animals (mostly sheep) of varying styles and sizes. What first occurred at The Catskill Chill Music Festival on a small scale last summer had now made it’s way to the Jam Cruise world on a large scale. As a result, musicians and their children, like New Orleans trombonist Big Sam (Big Sam’s Funky Nation) and Marco Benevento‘s daughter Ruby, adopted animals. Big Sam adopted a sheep and named her…what else? Harmony!

What's with the stuffed animals, you ask?

What’s with the stuffed animals, you ask?

Front row rage with Jessica, Laurie and LUCY!

Front row rage with Jessica, Laurie and LUCY!

Jam Cruisers and their animals were all over the Bowlive scene during the ten day residency but Big Sam is the only artists who engaged in the enjoyment of his adopted pet publicly. Before the show, I was with a friend who had brought her lamb, Lucy. We ran into Big Sam and asked about Harmony. He had her in a plastic bag in his hand. Right then and there, Harmony was brought out and Lucy and she “played” and “danced” a bit together before Big Sam took Harmony backstage! Over the run, Lucy (NY), Smiley-Face (MD), Harmony (NOLA), Fluffy (VA) and Jimmy (NJ) would make their way from various parts of America with their adoptive parents to enjoy Bowlive shows from the front row.  Big Sam’s Harmony, however, was the only one who engaged in the back stage rage and got to dance on stage. Enjoy the clip:


At the end of the day, this new vein within our scene is representative of the curiosity and connection that we all posses and/or seek. Just as The Karma Wash and Fan Club Headquarters are relevant, so is this fun idea. Amazingly, lots of people have mascots and the addition of this adoption program has spawned multiple mascot meetups and adoptive front row rages around our scene. Be sure to look for a stuffed sheep or mascot near you and share a dance 🙂

Neal Evans (Photo by Phrazz)

Neal Evans (Photo by Phrazz)

The previous two evenings, the trio infused their sounds with special guest southern slide guitarist Luther Dickinson and jazz great John Scofield. On this night, Karl Denson (Karl Denson’s Tiny Universe), Sam Williams (Big Sam’s Funky Nation), and Rahzel (The Roots) graced the stage with their flute and saxophone, trombone and beat boxing, respectively.

The organ-based jazz trio kicked off their set with “Steppin,” off their 2010 Live at the Blue Note Tokyo album and “Uncle Junior,” 2007 Get Down album. As the three core leaders of Bowlive, they immediately established that there would be no slowing down. By the middle of “Aladdin,” all three men on stage were fully invested.  Krasno was taking his solos at the edge of the stage, sometimes rising onto his toes, while Neal Evans dominated the song with his bass keys and organ play and Alan Evans slammed his drums with ferocity.

Karl Denson (Photo by Phrazz)

Karl Denson (Photo by Phrazz)

Karl Denson was announced as the audience was told that he “just got off a plane and walked on this stage.”  Karl Denson is one of the hardest working musicians in the business and his passion for his craft drips off every note he plays. He is a fast, funky band leader who is always consistent in his delivery.  “The Swamp” and “Rudy’s Way” followed with Denson choosing to add his flute to the beautifully composed songs.  The addition of Karl’s flute to the sound of our favorite trio added another dimension of emotion to the songs.  They continued with “Shaheed,” off their 2001 album Doin’ Something where Karl’s flute provided a softness to the hard-edged song. Krasno raged his guitar till the strings broke and had to change to a new guitar and Neal Evans kicked a drum solo into the audience’s guts.

Alan Evans, Karl Denson, Big Sam, and Eric Krasno (Photo by Phrazz)

Alan Evans, Karl Denson, Big Sam, Eric Krasno & Nigel Hall (Photo by Phrazz)

Joining the foursome on stage next was Nigel Hall (The Warren Haynes Band) and Sam Williams (Big Sam’s Funky Nation). There can be no doubt that the danceable and excitable energy that Big Sam brings is something you can’t find in many artists. The New Orleans native, formerly the trombonist for the Dirty Dozen Brass Band, danced out on stage with his horn, picked up a stage prop that he had brought (his stuffed sheep named Harmony) and began to dance all around the stage. Nigel and Big Sam began grooving it together and the entire audience couldn’t help but beam over the energy of it all.  These are serious performances but it’s ALWAYS appropriate to have a good time and with just his presence; Big Sam will lift any crowd. The powerhouse of funk on stage slowed the rage down for the soulful, “Leave Me Alone,” sung by Hall. Karl Denson changed to his saxophone and kicked us a lightning fast solo to end the set.

Rage (Photo by Phrazz)

Rage (Photo by Phrazz)

Rahzel Set Break Set (Photo by Phrazz)

Rahzel Set Break Set (Photo by Phrazz)

Straying from the formula of the first two nights, during this set break the audience would not be staring at an empty stage waiting for the first set to start. Instead, Beat Boxer Rahzel, the “Godfather of Noyze,” came out to keep them engaged.  Watching the audience react to this amazing addition to the night was almost as exciting as watching Rahzel. Specialize in the “fifth element of hip-hop,” Rahzel’s instrument is himself and a microphone.  He is a vocal percussionist who uses his breath, mouth and body to imitate sounds, instruments and voices.  He projected unmistakable beats from the Wu-Tang Clan and Run DMC. He became a DJ scratching records, created a buzzing insect around his head and brought Optimus Prime (Transforms) to life on stage with his robotic sounds. His signature song, “If Your Mother Only Knew” is always the highlight of a Rahzel performance. Rahzel simultaneously sings the lyrics and works the beats. It is quite difficult to even comprehend how Rahzel does what he does!  AMAZING!

Rubber Soulive Album

Rubber Soulive Album

Before Beatle Mania could kick off the first set, Soulive joined Rahzel on stage and performed “I Am the Magnificent” and it was just that, magnificent.  The entire first half of the second set consisting of songs chosen off Soulive’s latest album, Rubber Soulive.  “Come Together,” “Eleanor Rigby,” and I Want You (She’s So Heavy).” The audience sang along to the first song while the psychedelic lights and trippy sounds emanating off stage for “She’s So Heavy” was reinvented through the jazz trio.

Karl Denson, Big Sam, Nigel Hall and Lenesha Randolph (Photo by Phrazz)

Karl Denson, Big Sam, Nigel Hall and Lenesha Randolph (Photo by Phrazz)

Questlove (Photo by Phrazz)

Questlove (Photo by Phrazz)

Big Sam, Karl Denson, Nigel Hall and now, Lenesha Randolph (Robert Randolph and the Family Band) joined the stage for “Too Much.” Randolph and Hall sang the up-beat tune while Karl and Big Sam took their turn at the mic delivering some of the hardest, funkiest horn solos that Bowlive audiences will experience this run.  They kept up the pace with Stevie Wonder’s “Signed, Sealed, Delivered” and Questlove (The Roots) replacing Alan Evans, who picked up a guitar.

Full Stage Rage (Photo by Phrazz)

Full Stage Rage (Photo by Phrazz)

The entire crew of Soulive and their special guests kicked off the end of the set with “Tuesday Night Squad.”  Big Sam dominated a 3 minute long trombone rage, Alan was back on killin it on the drums, Nigel was on the Bongos before heading over to Neal where the pair did a little dance, if you will, shifting back and forth past each other to manipulate the various levels of keys that Neal’s kit provides.  Hall sang James Brown’s “Beweildered,” a deep, soulful song that required Nigel to reach the top of his range, and then he walked off stage.  It was back into “Tuesday Night Squad” to close the set.

Nigel and Neal Rage the Boards (Photo by Phrazz)

Nigel and Neal Rage the Boards (Photo by Phrazz)

There was never really an encore because every musician on stage was so into the music and feeling the audience’s energy that they chose to just play through and give their fans that extra five minutes of music that every audience desires.

Download Night 3 Sound Board Audio Here!

In three days Bowlive III had now brought us jazz, soul, psychedelic rock, New Orleans funk, hip-hop and southern-style blues in only three nights. The following evening, the party continued with Karl Denson sticking around for a second night and Jennifer Hartswick (Trey Anastasio Band) joining with her funky trumpet and soulful voice.

Pictures by Phrazz

Videos by: I can’t believe there are no videos for this entire night. If anyone finds some, send them my way

Words by The Tiny Rager

Read Full Post »

Neal Evans (Photo by Phrazz)

Neal Evans (Photo by Phrazz)

The second night of BOWLIVE III at The Brooklyn Bowl started similarly to the previous evening with Soulive members Eric Krasno and brothers Neal Evans and Alan Evans taking the stage alone for the first two songs.  “Shaheed,” from band’s 2001 album Doin’ Something, and “DIG,” from their 2003 self-titled album started the set. With the members of Soulive choosing to open the sets themselves, they took on on the entire responsibility of pumping up their audience. They fully succeeded.  By the end of the second song, audience members were whispering that this night was even hotter than the last.

Eric Krasno (Picture by Phrazz)

Eric Krasno (Picture by Phrazz)

Luther Dickinson (Photo by Phrazz)

Luther Dickinson (Photo by Phrazz)

For those who couldn’t make this night due to responsibilities, I understand your pain. This evening would be one that would go down in Soulive history. For those of you who chose to come to the first and not the second, purely on issues related to laziness, I know you feel pissed enough. I won’t rub it in. Seeing how Luther Dickinson and John Scofield didn’t get on stage together with Krazno in the first night, one could logically assume that following day would see our hope delivered. All three guitarists on stage…at the same time!!

Luther and Krasno (Photo by Phrazz)

Luther and Krasno (Photo by Phrazz)

John Scofield, considered one of the “big three” of America’s current jazz guitarists, joined the stage for a second night with a pink guitar and giant smile.  “Nealization,” off their 2003 album Turn It Out, which Scofield performed on the album for this song, was next on the energized set-list. The energy level for a Wednesday night at the Brooklyn Bowl that was two-thirds full was stellar. The players on stage had picked up where they left off the night before and continued to elevate throughout the entire night.

Nigel Hall, the soulful vocalist and keyboardist from The Warren Haynes Band, was a much larger presence last night coming out on the Billy Cobham and George Duke tune, “Stratus.” Hall’s passion for the Fusion genre, especially George Duke, runs DEEP so you can only imagine how tight, invested and amazing he was performing the tune. Absolutely CRUSHING with Scofield distorting his rock-oriented sound! John Lennon’s “Jealous Guy” and Freddie Hubbard’s “Provo” followed.

With Nigel still on stage, delivering a fun Moog solo half way through, they performed the Scofield original, “Hottentot.” Alan Evans was clearly feeling this song as he threw in slight change ups in his beats that altered the style and sound in a great way, if only for a few seconds. His eyes closed and his lips pursed during the intense moments of connection to his instrument, Alan Evans was fully engaging and stood out as a leader on stage that night.

Luther Dickinson (Photo by Phrazz)

Luther Dickinson (Photo by Phrazz)

Ending the set with Nappy Brown’s 1957 cover made popular by Ray Charles, “The Night Time is the Right Time,” Soulive and guitar god history was made. Luther Dickinson (North Mississippi Allstars), John Scofield and Eric Krasno were all on the stage at the same time, for the first time. This was the moment that the die-hard fans were waiting for.  Nigel Hall sang the bluesy love song while the audience witnessed the three guitarists take their turns playing in their own unique and respective styles in a solo.

Luther Dickinson eventually left the stage as the song continued. Then, what I definitely considered one of the most interesting guitar banters of the musical run, took place. Scofield and Krasno played off each other’s rifts in one of the most unusual and gorgeous ways this super fan has ever witnessed. The Evans brothers lightened their presence, tapping a little lighter and recognizing the moment that was taking place. It was almost as if the two guitars were holding a conversation. The audience was silent when the song ended and then they erupted. THIS WAS WHY THESE MEN DO WHAT THEY DO! These rare moments of musical collaborations are what define Bowlive.

During set break audience members engaged in the Brooklyn Bowl’s amazing Blue Ribbon Fried Chicken, played a game of bowling and could be heard comparing the two evenings. Everyone was in agreement that this night kicked the previous night out of the water.

The second set started with Luther Dickinson joining the stage immediately for “Outrage” and stayed on stage for the entire set. “Bubble” and “All Night Long” were simply fantastic. There was no warming up this time, no taking it slow and simple. It was a full speed ahead.

Luther Dickinson and Eric Krasno (Photo by Phrazz)

Luther Dickinson and Eric Krasno (Photo by Phrazz)

Nigel Hall (Photo By Phrazz)

Nigel Hall (Photo By Phrazz)

Neal Evans was a force to be reckoned with during the second set with his heavy-handed organ play sounding excellent partnered with Dickinson’s slide guitar for “Shake Your Momma.”  Nigel Hall came out on stage once again to perform Muddy Water’s “Champagne and Reefer,” which had the audience laughing in agreement to the lyrics.

Alan Evans (Photo by Phrazz)

Alan Evans (Photo by Phrazz)

The encore was spectacular. Leaving the stage for only 120 seconds, Soulive and Luther Dickinson literally ran back on stage to perform “Spanish Castle” by Jimi Hendrix.  Their excitement was evident as Dickinson sang the verses and Alan Evans sang the chorus. No one wanted the show to end but the audience accepted the fact that these talented musicians needed their rest.

We had eight more days to go and Soulive’s passion and desire to strive would ensure that the coming nights continue bringing straight fire. Tommorrow’s rage would consume me with the FUNK as Karl Denson, Big Sam and Rahzel continue where Luther Dickinson and John Scofield left off.

Download Night 2 Sound Board Audio Here!

Pictures by Phrazz

Videos by Marc Millman and mkdevo

Words by The Tiny Rager

Read Full Post »

I had the pleasure of writing for Royal Family Records website for all ten nights for Bowlive III. So, if you care for the shorter, not so critical and emotional charged recaps, head over to RoyalFamilyRecords.com and read up there as you all know the following post will be full of extra details and a much longer recap. Available videos are linked to the song titles! With that said:

HAPPY BOWLIVE NEW YORK CITY!!

BOWLIVE RAGERS!!!  (Photo by Phrazz)

BOWLIVE RAGERS!!! (Photo by Phrazz)

I must start this recap by giving mad love to the Brooklyn Bowl.  If you have never been, what are you waiting for? Their food is killer, their big, leather couches lining the bowling lanes and open feel makes it one of the best venues in Brooklyn, if not all of NYC.  Owner, Pete Shapiro, is one of the most humble, caring, proprietors of an establishment that I have ever had the pleasure of meeting. His connections and passion to the music scene are evident as he joins the audience when amazing performances are taking place.  For an example of his kindness, Josh (My Mega Rager) and I got engaged last week in Mexico and are frequent attendees at Brooklyn Bowl performances. It is our favorite venue in the city and not just because Josh and I met there at a Karl Denson show two years ago.

Josh and I thanked Pete last night for providing us with such a great platform to meet. He bought us a bottle of champagne and we all shared a celebratory “Cheers.”  Josh and I are not drinkers but that didn’t stop the toast because when Pete Shapiro buys you a drink, you take it 🙂 I have now only seen Josh take a shot of tequila (a gift from the Brooklyn Bowl on his birthday) and now a glass of champagne.  Thanks again Pete and all the staff who run the Brooklyn Bowl for providing us such a wonderful place to engage in our musical passions, to engage with our musical family and friends and for your killer fried chicken.  As well, the addition of the hooks under the bar and upper level viewing deck did not go unnoticed and had both male and females singing the praises of having their purses and jackets now off the sticky ground 🙂  Quality upgrade!!! Now, on to the real magic.

Bowlive III – Night 1 Recap

Faithful fans of Soulive descend upon the Brooklyn Bowl, one of Brooklyn’s premier music venues, on February 28, 2012 for the first night of the highly anticipated ten-night residency, BOWLIVE III.

Faithful Fans (minus a few) (Photo by Phrazz)

Faithful Fans (minus a few) (Photo by Phrazz)

Alan Evans (Photo by Phrazz)

Alan Evans (Photo by Phrazz)

In previous years, Bowlive audiences have had the pleasure of witnessing diverse line-ups of well-known (Warren Haynes, Derek Trucks, Maceo Parker) and up and coming musicians (The London Souls, Alecia Chakour and Mel Flannery), taking their turn on stage with guitarist Eric Krasno, organist and bass keys player  Neal Evans and drummer Alan Evans, the soulful trio who inspire these ten nights of musical magic. Bowlive III was no different with scheduled collaborations by Zach Deputy, Big Sam, Karl Denson, Questlove, Lettuce, Rahzel, Allen Stone, Jennifer Hartswick, and the Alecia Chakour Band. More additions were added continuously over the run so I keep my eyes (and ears) open.

Mike Gibney, The Royal Family’s announcer or HYPE BOY, if you will, came out on stage to announce the band. He is a hilarious, happy, charming, funny man who never fails to pump up the crowd with his wit and humor or hilarious Cosby Sweater-styled outfits.  Tonight, pimpin’ a nice suit, he would scream out how proud he was of himself for being “undefeated in Bowlive History!”  I had to scream “ME TOO!” as loud as I could as there are literally a handful of fans AND staff who have actually attended all ten nights the previous years. I have gone to 29 out of 30 Bowlive shows.

Straying from the formula of the past two years, Soulive hit the stage early, opting out of an opening band until the weekend performances.  The trio stated slow with the appropriate “So Live.” Their energy was calm and they warmed up nicely into the explosive “Hat Trick,” which would set the tone for the rest of the night. Opting out of an opener really placed full responsibility on the trio to ensure the energy was up, to ensure that we stayed engaged, and to ensure that they made the point that they were back!!!  Having seen these three musicians grow since 2000, there was nothing standing in their way last night.

Neal Evans (Photo by Phrazz)

Neal Evans (Photo by Phrazz)

You know when you see the same band over and over and it sometimes appears that they are going through the motions?  I have seen Soulive and its members in their various projects for over a decade now. I hold them to a very high standard as the point of all of this is growth. Growth as a band and as individual musicians.  Bowlive provides a platform for these men to expand their musical catalog by infusing their material with the styles of the special guests that join them.  Because of all these collaborations, it could be easy as the hosts to, perhaps, not invest as much power and passion into the solo songs where the trio played alone.  Of course, this is something that SHOULDN’T happen, and on this first night, it didn’t. I looked forward to watching this monster of a musical run grow beneath our feet and in front of our eyes and to watch the exposure of stamina and talent of these three musical masters were going to have to project as time goes on.

Eric Krasno (Photo by Phrazz)

Eric Krasno (Photo by Phrazz)

The Legendary John Scofield (Photo By Phrazz)

The Legendary John Scofield (Photo By Phrazz)

John “Sco” Scofield, one of America’s greatest Jazz guitarists and composers, was the first guest to appear on stage this year. I absolutely adore seeing Sco and Krasno collaborate.  Joining the trio on the third song, “Tabasco”, a Sco original, Krazno and Sco immediately engaged in each other. Coming ever so close to each other, face to face on stage, they played off each others rifts with the Evan brothers blasting their rhythms.  A Billy Cobham cover, “Red Baron,” followed allowing for each musician on stage to throw down some lightening rod solos.  Sco’s time on stage brought a range of psychedelic jamming and jazz infusion to the trio’s sound that only Sco can help create. This was an exciting show simply because of the fact that John Scofield, Eric Krasno and Luther Dickinson would all be performing together in various combinations throughout the night. For guitar loving rockers like me and every other male that was in that audience, this was FIRE!!! What a great way to start it off.

Nigel Hall (Photo by Phrazz)

Nigel Hall (Photo by Phrazz)

Nigel Hall joins Neal Evans on Keys (Photo by Phrazz)

Nigel Hall joins Neal Evans on Keys (Photo by Phrazz)

Nigel Hall (The Warren Haynes Band, Dr. Klaw) was next to join the stage, initially jumping in on the keyboards with Alan Evan during “What You See Is What You Get.”  The Nigel Hall Band actually opened almost every night during the first Bowlive in 2012. This run, however, Hall took to the microphone only once with his band to deliver the sultry, sexy Donny Hathaway cover “More Then You’ll Ever Know.” Hall’s emotional connection to this powerful ballad was evident as he melted the hearts in front of him. I watched men kiss their girls passionately, I watched bros hug it out on the main floor and I felt my own heart melt.  Hall left immediately for home after the song and I texted him to let him know that his connection was so clear to those who were paying attention.  His response: “Thank you! When you’ve been in love, you can relate.” I hoped that we would get to experience more of him during this run but at the time, nothing was scheduled. We kept those fingers crossed.

John Scofield and Soulive (Photo by Phrazz)

John Scofield and Soulive (Photo by Phrazz)

“Boozer,” another Sco original, end the KILLER first set with Sco thanking Soulive for allowing him to join the party and calling Nigel Hall a “genius.” That statement is powerful and honest and to hear it ring from Sco’s lips, I know for a fact that Nigel’s heart swelled. Mine certainly did.

Nigel Hall connecting with John Scofield (Photo by Phrazz)

Nigel Hall connecting with John Scofield (Photo by Phrazz)

After a short intermission, the Evans brothers and Krasno were back on stage, alone, performing the beautifully composed “El Ron,”  followed by a raging “One in Seven.” No special guests needed to be on stage to ensure that fire was coming off it.  The trio was living up to their responsibilities and taking the songs we have seen them play a million times and breathing fresh life and RAGE into them.

Luther and Soulive - Outstanding Performance

Luther and Soulive  (Photo by Phrazz)

Luther Dickinson (Photo by Phrazz)

Luther Dickinson (Photo by Phrazz)

When southern-style slide guitarist Luther Dickinson (North Mississippi AllStars) joined the stage, all hell broke loose.  Literally, broke shit up all over our brains and faces.  Booker T. and the MG’s cover “Hip Hug Her” started slow and simple, a playing quality that Luther Dickinson has perfected with his understated simplicity and lightening fast fingers.  Initially, after the great versions of Soulive’s original songs had just brought the energy up, Dickinson’s simplistic playing and calm warm-up seemed to bring the energy down but only for that first song. The set continued with Dickinson, Krasno and the Evan brothers elevating their quality of playing to the peak of high energy for the evening, downright melting the audience’s faces with solo after solo after solo.

Dickinson and Krasno (Photo by Phrazz)

Dickinson and Krasno (Photo by Phrazz)

At one point, the wonderful Alan Evans was left alone the stage for an isolated drum solo lit by a single house light. His serious composure throughout the evening provided the foundation for all this musical majesty to take place. Neal Evans’ organ play was deep, intense, raw and when paired with the slide guitar of Dickinson, brought Soulive’s sound to new heights. It is collaborations like these that make Bowlive so special.  How can we watch the same group for ten nights in a row and not get bored? Well, that is their job and they do their job RIGHT!

Luther and Soulive - Outstanding Performance

Luther and Soulive (Photo by Phrazz)

At times when a song is taking off, I like to take a walk through the audience and listen to them, their comments, their critics (if they know what they are talking about) and just engage in the energy around me.  When they broke into “Hear My Train” by Jimi Hendrix, the rage that ensued both on stage and in the audience was palpable. “Holy Shit” and “Do you see what is happening on stage?” were common statement that could be heard throughout the sea of heady heads. People hushed those around them talking too loud and eyes were transfixed on the stage ~ (Some might say STFUAD – Shut The F*&K Up And Dance). The foursome encored with another Hendrix song, “Stone Free,” a tight, jamming song that cemented the power of the evening and left the audience screaming with thunderous applause.

WINNING!!!!

WINNING!!!! (Photo by Phrazz)

Bowlive III had begun in New York City!!  We only prayed that we could handle it because after the freight train of rage that was released that night; there would be no stopping it. The power that slides off of these performances are unlike any regular 2-set performances you attend. The energy and collaborations that I would enjoy in the coming weeks would far surpass many musical runs I might experience.  TEN NIGHTS!!!!  That is a superb feat for any musician of ANY age to accomplish. For those of us with day jobs and for those of us expected to process material by the next morning, it’s even more of a feat. One that I have been proud to be a part of for the last two years.

Setlist Rage!

The Initial Setlist!

Download Night 1 Sound Board Audio Here!

Pictures by Phrazz

Videos by Marc Millman and mkdevo

Words by The Tiny Rager

Check out some amazing Bowlive Shots by Michael Jurick here!

Read Full Post »

Steve Kimock Residency: Night I @ Sullivan Hall (03.23.11)

Steve Kimock (Photo by TinyRager)

Steve Kimock (Photo by TinyRager)

Guitarist extraordinaire, Steve Kimock (Zero, Crazy Engine), kicked off a three night residency at Sullivan Hall last night in Manhattan’s Lower East Side.  The crowd was thin as not many New Yorkers braved the lightening hail and sleet storm that came through unexpectedly.  Those who did were delivered an intimate, magical musical treat.

Line Up:

Steve Kimock – Guitar
Andy Hess – Bass
Henry Butler – Keys
John Morgan Kimock – Drums

Special Guests:
Donna Jean Godchaux – Vocals
Marc Muller – Guitar
Chris Burger – Vocals

Kimock Residency (Photo by K. Dugan)

Kimock Residency (Photo by K. Dugan)

Joining Steve Kimock on Sullivan Hall’s stage last night was the acclaimed New Orleans pianist Henry Butler, bassist Andy Hess (Govt Mule, Black Crowes, John Scofield) and Steve’s son, John Morgan Kimock (Crazy Engine), on drums.  There were a few surprise guests as well.  After only one song into the first set, the foursome welcomed Donna Jean Godchaux (The Grateful Dead) and guitarist Marc Muller, from Dead On: Recreating The Grateful Dead Note For Note, graced the stage for the remainder of the set.

Kimock Residency (Photo by K. Dugan)

Kimock Residency (Photo by K. Dugan)

JMK (Photo by K. Dugan)

JMK (Photo by K. Dugan)

Now just for perspective on my love for Steve Kimock, I just need to throw a little info out there.  When I am I am asked to think of a musician that closely resembles or embodies Jerry Garcia or his spirit, my mind almost always shoots to Steve Kimock.  There really is no other name that ever seems to push Kimock’s out of my mind as a front runner. He is a musician I look to as a teacher.  He is a musician who is constantly willing to connect with his fans, willing to nourish new talent when he discovers it and constantly pushing the envelope of where he can take you with his guitar.


Click HERE for video of their rehearsal of “Crazy Fingers”

Butler and Kimock (Photo by K. Dugan)

Butler and Kimock (Photo by K. Dugan)

There was a stimulating sense of connection within the venue last night.  The lack of audience members did not create an empty feel as the music filled the space magnificently.  The first set was a straight up Grateful Dead infused vibe!  “Nana’s Chalk Pipe” started it off with Henry Butler’s New Orleans infused key play over the trippy Kimock guitar.  It was amazing, such a unique combination of sounds hitting such a small stage.  “Watch The River Flow,” an improved song with Donna Jean joining the stage for lyrics, followed.  “Crazy Fingers” brought the headiness up, up, up.  The group would break into free for all jams that flowed for minutes at a time, “Scarlett Begonias” showcasing each artist’s talents.  Kimock, seated on a stool, would close his eyes and melt into the jam from time to time.  It was moments like these where you could feel the air of Garcia around you. Marc Muller couldn’t have been more on point and it took a while for her vocals to warm up but once they did, Donna Jean’s voice and pure connection to Jerry helped stimulate the energy surrounding us.  They ended the set with a killer “Franklin’s Tower,” where Henry Butler made it clear to us that he felt the music, felt the spirit of Jerry within him.  I have never heard Henry Butler sound quite like he did last night.

The second set was supremely funkier. Andy Hess’s bass lines found their way to the forefront of the songs and Chris Burger (Alphabet Soup) joined the stage for a free style rap session that lasted over 15 minutes with deep exquisite solos brought out by each musician.  Ironically rapping of “rain” on such a gloomy night, he reminded us of the “yin and the yangs” of life which brought a completely different vibe from the first set.  Afterward, we welcomed the weather that was in store for us when we exited the venue. The remainder of the set delivered us a stage full of talented musicians jamming away at their leisure with a melodic under tone that helped lead them through to the end of the set.

Chris Burger (Photo by K. Dugan)

Chris Burger (Photo by K. Dugan)

Set I

Nana’s Chalk Pipe
Watchin’ the River Flow*
Crazy Fingers
Scarlet Begonias^
Eyes of the World
Franklins Tower

*Donna Jean Godchaux remains onstage for set 1
^Marc Muller from Dead On remains on stage for set I

Set II

Thing One
All Together Now *
Something You Got
It’s Up to You

*with vocals by CB (Chris Burger of Band of Brotherz/Alphabet Soup)

Next Wednesday, March 30, 2011, Steve Kimock will be back on stage welcoming Drummer Adam Deitch, Marco Benevento and Marc Friedman (The Slip).

Read Full Post »

March Music Calendar

March 2011 Potential Show Run Down

Calendar updated daily!

Tuesday, March 1st, 2011

Wednesday, March 2nd, 2011

Thursday, March 3rd, 2011

  • (Free) The Jamie McLean Band @ 315 Bowery
    • John Varvatos Presents: JMB’s 2011 EP Release Party! Free Show! Open Bar!
  • ($10) Red Baraat @ Barbes
  • ($15) Bowlive 2: Soulive w/ Corey Glover & Bernie Worrell @ Brooklyn Bowl
  • ($33-$95) Tibet House Benefit Concert @ Carnegie Hall
    • Feat: Philip Glass, Tenzin Choegyal, The Flaming Lips, Angelique Kidjo, Taj Mahal, James McCartney, The Roots, Patti Smith, Jesse Smith and Michael Campbell, Michael Stipe
  • ($40-$80) Mahler’s Fourth Symphony @ Avery Fisher Hall

Friday, March 4th, 2011

  • ($7-$10) Official Conspirator After-Show feat. The Manhattan Project @ The Delancey
  • ($15) Bowlive 2: Soulive w/ Robert Randolph & Corey Glover @ The Brooklyn Bowl
  • ($25) Rebelution and Giant Panda Guerilla Dub Squad @ Irving Plaza
  • ($25) Conspirator @ Gramercy Theatre (Mis Ter Bugsley)
  • ($30) Larry Coryell Power Trio with Victor Bailey & Lenny White @ Iridium Jazz Club
  • ($40-$80) Mahler’s Fourth Symphony @ Avery Fisher Hall
  • ($40-$45) Dr. John and the Lower 911, Marco Benevento, High and Mighty Brass Band @ Sullivan Hall

Saturday, March 5th, 2011

  • (Free) West African Band @ St. Nicks, Harlem (late night)
  • ($15) Bowlive 2: Soulive w/ Robert Randolph @ The Brooklyn Bowl
  • ($30) Larry Coryell Power Trio with Victor Bailey & Lenny White @ Iridium Jazz Club
  • ($40) 5th Annual Nolafunk Mardi Gras Ball: featuring Dr. John & The Lower 911 , Soul Rebels Brass Band and Sister Sparrow & The Dirty Birds @ Le Poisson Rouge
  • ($40-$80) Mahler’s Fourth Symphony @ Avery Fisher Hall
  • ($41-$331) Bon Jovi @ Madison Square Garden

Sunday, March 6tht, 2011

  • ($30) Larry Coryell Power Trio with Victor Bailey & Lenny White @ Iridium Jazz Club
  • ($30) Chico O’Farrill Afro-Cuban Jazz Orchestra @ Birdland NYC
  • ($30) Fred Hersch & Joshua Redman Duo @ Jazz Standard

Monday, March 7th, 2011

  • ($5) London Souls Residency @ The Brooklyn Bowl
  • ($8) Jim Campilongo @ The Living Room
  • ($25) Mingus Orchestra @ The Jazz Standard

Tuesday, March 8th, 2011

Wednesday, March 9th, 2011

Thursday, March 10th, 2011

Friday, March 11th, 2011

  • (FREE) Tall Tall Trees @ Rockwood Music Hall
  • ($15) Bowlive 2: Soulive w/ Karl Denson, Van Hunt @ The Brooklyn Bowl
  • ($15) Budos Band @ The Bell House
  • ($18) Tab Benoit & Kung Fu @ Sullivan Hall
  • ($22) Los Amigos Invisibles @ HighLine Ballroom
  • ($25) Devon Allman’s Honeytribe @ Iridium Jazz Club
  • ($30-$40) Al Dimeola World Sinofina @ The Blue Note
  • ($30-$43) Dropkick Murpheys @ Roseland Ballroom
  • ($35) Pete Yorn with very special guest Ben Kweller @ Terminal 5
  • ($46-$54) Piano Power: Brad Mehldau & Friends w/ Joshua Redman @ Zankle Hall
  • ($59) FURTHUR: Phil Lesh & Bob Weir @ Best Buy Theater
  • ($61-$172) Allman Brothers Band @ Beacon Theater

Saturday, March 12th, 2011

  • (Free) West African Band @ St. Nicks, Harlem (late night)
  • ($15) Bowlive 2: Soulive w/ Matisyahu
  • ($59) FURTHUR: Phil Lesh and Bob Weir @ Best Buy Theater
  • ($61-$172) Allman Brothers Band @ Beacon Theater
    • ($10) A Post Furthur and Allman Brothers Band Show w/ Reckoning @ Sullivan Hall
    • ($25) Post Allmans in New York Midnight Concert Series w/ The Yonrico Scott Band featuring Oteil and Kofi Burbridge @ Iridium Jazz Club

Sunday, March 13th, 2011

  • ($7) Afro Funky Party w/ Zongo Junction, Top Shotta & DJ Offbeat @ Cameo Gallery
  • ($30) Chico O’Farrill Afro-Cuban Jazz Orchestra @ Birdland NYC
  • ($30-$40) Al Dimeola World Sinofina @ The Blue Note (2 shows)
  • ($30-$42) Intimate Solo Acoustic Citizen Cope @ City Winery

Monday, March 14th, 2011

  • ($5) London Souls Residency @ The Brooklyn Bowl
  • ($8) Jim Campilongo @ The Living Room
  • ($25) Mingus Orchestra @ The Jazz Standard
  • ($30) Steve Martin performing with The Steep Canyon Rangers: An Evening of Bluegrass & Banjo @ Highline Ballroom
  • ($30-$42) Intimate Solo Acoustic Citizen Cope @ City Winery
  • ($61-$172) Allman Brothers Band @ Beacon Theater

Tuesday, March 15th, 2011

  • (Free) Dred Scott Trio @ Rockwood Music Hall (late night)
  • ($5) That 1 Guy @ The Brooklyn Bowl
  • ($30-$42) Intimate Solo Acoustic Citizen Cope @ City Winery
  • ($35) Steve Martin & the Steep Canyon Rangers @ Joe’s Pub
  • ($59) FURTHUR: Phil Lesh and Bob Weir @ Best Buy Theater
  • ($61-$172) Allman Brothers Band @ Beacon Theater

Wednesday, March 16th, 2011

  • ($10) Gent Treadly @ The Sugar Bar
  • ($30-$42) Intimate Solo Acoustic Citizen Cope @ City Winery (2 shows)
  • ($35) Steve Martin & the Steep Canyon Rangers @ Joe’s Pub
  • ($40) New York Dolls @ Bowery Ballroom
  • ($80-$180) Elton John @ Madison Square Garden

Thursday, March 17th, 2011

  • (Free) The Farewell Drifters @ Rockwood Music Hall
  • ($5) Dead Kenny G’s @ Brooklyn Bowl
  • ($15) Chris Morrisey Quartet w/ Mark Guiliana @ The Jazz Gallery
  • ($18-$22) JJ Grey(MOFRO) solo acoustic with Shannon McNally @ City Winery
  • ($35) Steve Martin & the Steep Canyon Rangers @ Joe’s Pub
  • ($40) New York Dolls @ Bowery Ballroom
  • ($50-$93) Celtic Women @ Radio City Music Hall
  • ($61-$172) Allman Brothers Band @ Beacon Theater

Friday, March 18th, 2011

  • (Free) Nutritious @ The Cove
  • ($5) The Heavy Pets (GOLDYS BIRTHDAY PARTY) @ The Brooklyn Bowl
  • ($5) Buzz Universe & Afro Skull @ The Bowery Poetry Club
  • ($30) Duduka Da Fonseca Quintet featuring Anat Cohen @ Jazz Standard
  • ($35) FUNK SUMMIT: Leo Nocentelli (The Meters), Bernie Worrell (P-Funk), Fred Wesley (James Brown, P-Funk) @ Iridium Jazz Club
  • ($61-$172) Allman Brothers Band @ Beacon Theater
    • ($12) A Post Allman Brothers Band Show featuring Some Cat From Japan: The Music Of Jimi Hendrix featuring Scott Metzger / Will Bernard / Ron Johnson / Eric Bolivar @ Sullivan Hall
  • ($60-$275) Janet Jackson – Number Ones, Up Close and Personal World Tour @ Radio City Music Hall

Saturday, March 19th, 2011

  • (Free) Mark Guiliana @ Rockwood Music Hall
  • (Free) West African Band @ St. Nicks, Harlem (late night)
  • ($10) Anders Osborne w/ Leroy Justice @ Brooklyn Bowl
  • ($30-$40) Pat Martino Organ Quartet @ Birdland
  • ($35) FUNK SUMMIT: Leo Nocentelli (The Meters), Bernie Worrell (P-Funk), Fred Wesley (James Brown, P-Funk) @ Iridium Jazz Club
  • ($40) Steve Martin & the Steep Canyon Rangers @ Music Hall of Williamsburg
  • ($61-$172) Allman Brothers Band @ Beacon Theater
  • ($60-$275) Janet Jackson – Number Ones, Up Close and Personal World Tour @ Radio City Music Hall

Sunday, March 20th, 2011

  • ($20) Murder By Death @ Rocks Off Cruise
  • ($30) Chico O’Farrill Afro-Cuban Jazz Orchestra @ Birdland NYC
  • ($60-$200) Diana Ross – Greatest Hits Tour @ St. George Theater, S.I.
  • ($75-$125) Benefit for Cornell Dupree w/ Cornell Dupree, Joe Cocker and Dr. John @ B.B. King Blues Club and Grill
  • ($80-$180) Elton John @ Madison Square Garden

Monday, March 21st, 2011

  • ($5) London Souls Residency @ The Brooklyn Bowl
  • ($8) Jim Campilongo @ The Living Room
  • ($10-$17) 101.9 Wrxp 3rd Anniversary Show Feat. Guster @ Irving Plaza
  • ($25) Mingus Dynasty @ The Jazz Standard
  • ($30) Rick Derringer @ Iridium Jazz Club
  • ($50) Keyshia Cole @ B.B. Kings
  • ($60-$275) Janet Jackson – Number Ones, Up Close and Personal World Tour @ Radio City Music Hall
  • ($61-$172) Allman Brothers Band @ Beacon Theater

Tuesday, March 22nd, 2011

  • (Free) Dred Scott Trio @ Rockwood Music Hall (late night)
  • ($15-$20) Mike Gordon @ The Brooklyn Bowl
  • ($18-$22) Noah and The Whale @ Bowery Ballroom
  • ($25-$40) Paula Cole – DIVINALE: A Month of Wine, Women and Song @ City Winery
  • ($40) Charlie Haden Quartet West Celebrates 25th Anniversary With Release of Sophisticated Ladies @ Birdland NYC
  • ($61-$172) Allman Brothers Band @ Beacon Theater

Wednesday, March 23rd, 2011

  • ($10/$12) Heyoka, The Malah, Octopus Nebulae, Tucci @ Public Assembly (Mis Ter Bugsley)
  • ($15) Surprise Me Mr. Davis @ The Bell House
  • ($15-$20) Mike Gordon @ The Brooklyn Bowl
  • ($20-$25) Steve Kimock 2011 NYC Residency w/ special guests Henry Butler , Andy Hess (Gov’t Mule, Black Crowes, John Scofield) and John Morgan Kimock @ Sullivan Hall
  • ($30) Jeff Lorber Fusion @ Iridium Jazz Club
  • ($40) Charlie Haden Quartet West Celebrates 25th Anniversary With Release of Sophisticated Ladies @ Birdland NYC

Thursday, March 24th, 2011

  • ($10) The Macpodz and Sister Sparrow And The Dirty Birds @ Studio at Webster Hall
  • ($25) James Blood Ulmer with The Memphis Blood Blues Band featuring Vernon Reid @ Jazz Standard
  • ($30) Jeff Lorber Fusion @ Iridium Jazz Club
  • ($40) Charlie Haden Quartet West Celebrates 25th Anniversary With Release of Sophisticated Ladies @ Birdland NYC
  • ($40-$52) Cold War Kids @ Radio City Music Hall
  • ($40-$80) Hungarian Echoes IV: Bartók’s First Piano Concerto @ Avery Fisher Hall
  • ($61-$172) Allman Brothers Band @ Beacon Theater

Friday, March 25th, 2011

  • ($??) Mahavishnu Project plays Jeff Beck (Wired, Blow By Blow, There & Back) @ Iridium Jazz Club
    • DVD Release Event for “Jeff Beck: Live at Iridium” [free DVD giveaways]
  • ($12) A Post Furthur & Allman Brothers Band Show featuring Some Cat From Japan: The Music Of Jimi Hendrix featuring Nigel Hall , Scott Metzger , Will Bernard , Ron Johnson , Eric Bolivar @ Sullivan Hall
  • ($18-$20) The Wood Brothers with Carsie Blanton @ City Winery (2 shows)
  • ($20) Black Joe Lewis & the Honeybears @ Bowery Ballroom
  • ($25) James Blood Ulmer with The Memphis Blood Blues Band featuring Vernon Reid @ Jazz Standard
  • ($25) Post Allmans in New York Midnight Concert Series Col. Bruce Hampton and Pharoah Gummitt Featuring Duane Trucks @ Iridium Jazz Club
  • ($30) Steve Smith, Jon Herington and Col. Bruce Hampton @ Iridium Jazz Club
  • ($32.50) Victor Wooten and Stanley Clarke @ BB Kings
  • ($40) Charlie Haden Quartet West Celebrates 25th Anniversary With Release of Sophisticated Ladies @ Birdland NYC
  • ($40-$47) Queens of the Stone Age @ Terminal 5
  • ($40-$80) Hungarian Echoes IV: Bartók’s First Piano Concerto @ Avery Fisher Hall
  • ($50-$60) Don McLean with Special Guest Dar Williams @ Town Hall
  • ($50-$84) Furthur @ Radio City Music Hall
  • ($61-$172) Allman Brothers Band @ Beacon Theater

Saturday, March 26th, 2011

  • (Free) West African Band @ St. Nicks, Harlem (late night)
  • ($10) A Post Furthur and Allman Brothers Show with Reflections @ Sullivan Hall
  • ($15-$20) Black Joe Lewis and the Honeybears @ Bowery Ballroom
  • ($25) James Blood Ulmer with The Memphis Blood Blues Band featuring Vernon Reid @ Jazz Standard
  • ($35) Hubert Sumlin Band @ Iridium Jazz Club
  • ($40) Charlie Haden Quartet West Celebrates 25th Anniversary With Release of Sophisticated Ladies @ Birdland NYC
  • ($40-$80) Hungarian Echoes IV: Bartók’s First Piano Concerto @ Avery Fisher Hall
  • ($45-$65) Afro-Cuban All Stars @ The Concert Hall
  • ($50-$84) Furthur @ Radio City Music Hall
  • ($61-$172) Allman Brothers Band @ Beacon Theater
  • ($100-$175) Rod Stewart / Stevie Nicks – Heart and Soul Tour @ Madison Square Garden

Sunday, March 27th, 2011

  • ($8-$10) Dangermuffin @ The Rock Shop
  • ($25) Hubert Sumlin Band @ Iridium Jazz Club
  • ($25) James Blood Ulmer with The Memphis Blood Blues Band featuring Vernon Reid @ Jazz Standard
  • ($30) Chico O’Farrill Afro-Cuban Jazz Orchestra @ Birdland NYC
  • ($40) Harlem Gospel Choir @ BB Kings
  • ($50-$84) Furthur @ Radio City Music Hall

Monday, March 28th, 2011

  • ($5) London Souls Residency @ The Brooklyn Bowl
  • ($8) Jim Campilongo @ The Living Room
  • ($25) Mingus Orchestra @ The Jazz Standard
  • ($25) New Sounds Live: So Percussion and Bobby Previte with John Medeski, Zeena Parkins, DJ Olive & Jen Shyu @ Merkin Concert Hall
  • ($35) Hubert Sumlin Band @ Iridium Jazz Club
  • ($40-$47) LCD Soundsystem @ Terminal 5
  • ($50-$117) Jeff Beck and Rock N Roll Party w/ Imelda May & Her Band @ Radio City Music Hall

Tuesday, March 29th, 2011

  • (Free) Dred Scott Trio @ Rockwood Music Hall (late night)
  • ($5) BoomBox @ Brooklyn Bowl
  • ($12-$65) Medeski Martin & Dunn, John Zorn & MASADA Marathon @ David H. Koch Theater
    • Featuring: Marc Ribot, Uri Caine, Dave Douglas, John Medeski, Secret Chiefs 3, Greg Cohen, Joey Baron, Cyro Baptista, Kenny Wollesen, Jamie Saft, Erik Friedlander, Mark Feldman, Sylvie Courvoisier, Trevor Dunn, and many others
  • ($20) Billy Martin w/ Dj Oliver and Ikue @ The Stone
  • ($30-$40) Kevin Eubanks Trio @ Birdland NYC
  • ($40-$47) LCD Soundsystem @ Terminal 5
  • ($55-$65) Billy Bragg – At Home In The City W/ Special guest Ben Sollee @ City Winery

Wednesday, March 30th, 2011

  • ($20) Steve Kimock 2011 NYC Residency with special guests Marco Benevento , Marc Friedman (The Slip) , Adam Deitch (Lettuce, Breakscience) @ Sullivan Hall
  • ($25) Reggie Watts @Music Hall of Williamsburg
  • ($30-$40) Kevin Eubanks Trio @ Birdland NYC
  • ($35-$60) Aaron Neville @ BB Kings Blues Club
  • ($40-$47) LCD Soundsystem @ Terminal 5
  • ($55-$65) Billy Bragg – At Home In The City W/ Special guest Ben Sollee @ City Winery

Thursday, March 31st, 2011

  • ($20) Mimosa @ Irving Plaza (Mis Ter Bugsley)
  • ($27.50) Tim Reynolds @ Iridium Jazz Club
  • ($30-$40) Kevin Eubanks Trio @ Birdland NYC
  • ($40-$47) LCD Soundsystem @ Terminal 5
  • ($55-$65) Billy Bragg – At Home In The City W/ Special guest Ben Sollee @ City Winery

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »

%d bloggers like this: