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Soulive is back and full of energy for their fourth annual BOWLIVE Residency held at the ever-popular Brooklyn Bowl.  Bowlive is an exciting time for the New York City music community, which was made clear last night as Soulive performed to a sold-out crowd. A crowd who showed up to RAGE with Eric Krasno (guitar), Neal Evans (drums), and Alan Evans (Hammond B3 organ, bass keys, clavinet) while a blizzard whipped around outside.

A few things have changed this year. There are eight nights instead of ten, there are more guests than ever and you should expect surprises every night. However, one constant that never falters is Soulive’s devotion to diversity. Their mission is clear. Showcase multiple genres of music by hosting amazing guests backed by the trio’s own diverse talents.

44439_10151538968272755_2083839976_nWith the most powerful kick-off in the last four years, the rocking Jazz Funk Fusion of KUNG FU opened the run at 8:30 on the dot. KUNG FU is made up of keyboardist Todd Stoops (RAQ), bassist Chris DeAngelis (The Breakfast), saxophonist Rob Somerville (DBB), guitarist Tim Palmieri and drummer Adrian Tramontano (The Breakfast). They powered through their set-list with crushing intensity and warmed up the crowd with favorites “Do the Right Thing,” “Popcorn,” and “Scrabb.”

Then came the moment the crowd had been waiting for since the rosemary-scented close of Bowlive III. The power trio began their set with the electric “Outrage,” as the crowd leapt off the floor, fists punching the air. The raging Soulive classic “Hat Trick,” a psychedelic “Shaheed,” and rocking “Tuesday” followed, with the venue filling with Soulive’s tight and full sound.

Blues harmonica player John Popper (Blues Traveler) was the first guest to grace the stage with Soulive.  Choosing the classic Beatles tune “Come Together,” fans were delighted to watch the traditionally instrumental song be sung by Popper himself!  The Blue Traveler’s tune “Mulling It Over” closed the set with high intensity and passionate fans screaming their praises.

The trio that never ceases to amaze wasted no time with long set breaks.  Only a few minutes went by before the boys were back on stage, this time with slide guitarist Luther Dickinson (North Mississippi Allstars) demanding the audience to “Shake What Your Momma Gave Ya.” While our attention generally would have been on the musicians, the crowd’s attention was pulled to the bowling lanes where four dancers in mod outfits shook their own asses up and down the aisles for the surprised crowd. A wonderful, fresh idea that reminded us that the guys are just as fun as they are talented.

With the crowd popping with energy and excitement,  Soulive continued to tackle our musical senses with Luther Dickinson singing a ripping version of Jimi Hendrix’s “Spanish Castle Magic.” During George Harrison’s “While My Guitar Gently Weeps,” the amazing guitar styling of Dickinson and Eric Krasno were showcased through stunning solos.

Percussionist Cody Dickinson (North Mississippi Allstars) joined the stage for the Beatles “Tomorrow Never Knows,” Bob Dylan’s “Someday Baby,” and “Shake ‘Em on Down,” a country-style blues song recorded by Bukka White in 1937. The Dickinson brother’s southern-blues flavor enhanced every tune.

When Cody Dickinson knelt down and put on his washboard and his thimbles, the crowd paid deeper attention as they knew something unique was about to take place. Cody’s metal tipped fingers danced around on the electric washboard, closing the set with his rhythmic sounds backed by amazing bass licks from Neal Evans.

Final guest, DJ ?uestlove (The Roots), was unable to make the show due to circumstances out of his control. Eric Krasno announced to the audience that the power trio would continue playing and the crowd went wild. Then, the first unannounced special guest, Saunders Sermons (Tedeschi Trucks Band), sang and provided trombone for the Bill Wither’s cover “Kissin My Love.” It was a wonderful close to the first night of what promises to be another outstanding run.

Over the next seven nights, Soulive fans will hear music from legendary bass player George Porter, Jr., the heavy rocking London Souls, the soulful singing of Alecia Chakour, the powerful blows of the Shady Horns and so many more surprise artists who sit on the sidelines, hoping and itching to have a chance to join Soulive’s stage. Tonight, put your dancing shoes back on for pedal steel slide guitarist Robert Randolph (Robert Randolph and the Family Band) and soul singer Lee Fields (Lee Fields and the Expressions).

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Soulive members, the rhythmic Evans brothers Neal and Alan and guitarist Eric Krasno transformed The Brooklyn Bowl from a guitar god’s wet dream to a world of funk and Beatle Mania on the third night of Bowlive III.

However, before the show could start, there were a few adventures I went on that I would like to share.  The most silly adventure was first. On Jam Cruise this year, a girl named Harmony held a pet adoption with stuffed animals (mostly sheep) of varying styles and sizes. What first occurred at The Catskill Chill Music Festival on a small scale last summer had now made it’s way to the Jam Cruise world on a large scale. As a result, musicians and their children, like New Orleans trombonist Big Sam (Big Sam’s Funky Nation) and Marco Benevento‘s daughter Ruby, adopted animals. Big Sam adopted a sheep and named her…what else? Harmony!

What's with the stuffed animals, you ask?

What’s with the stuffed animals, you ask?

Front row rage with Jessica, Laurie and LUCY!

Front row rage with Jessica, Laurie and LUCY!

Jam Cruisers and their animals were all over the Bowlive scene during the ten day residency but Big Sam is the only artists who engaged in the enjoyment of his adopted pet publicly. Before the show, I was with a friend who had brought her lamb, Lucy. We ran into Big Sam and asked about Harmony. He had her in a plastic bag in his hand. Right then and there, Harmony was brought out and Lucy and she “played” and “danced” a bit together before Big Sam took Harmony backstage! Over the run, Lucy (NY), Smiley-Face (MD), Harmony (NOLA), Fluffy (VA) and Jimmy (NJ) would make their way from various parts of America with their adoptive parents to enjoy Bowlive shows from the front row.  Big Sam’s Harmony, however, was the only one who engaged in the back stage rage and got to dance on stage. Enjoy the clip:


At the end of the day, this new vein within our scene is representative of the curiosity and connection that we all posses and/or seek. Just as The Karma Wash and Fan Club Headquarters are relevant, so is this fun idea. Amazingly, lots of people have mascots and the addition of this adoption program has spawned multiple mascot meetups and adoptive front row rages around our scene. Be sure to look for a stuffed sheep or mascot near you and share a dance 🙂

Neal Evans (Photo by Phrazz)

Neal Evans (Photo by Phrazz)

The previous two evenings, the trio infused their sounds with special guest southern slide guitarist Luther Dickinson and jazz great John Scofield. On this night, Karl Denson (Karl Denson’s Tiny Universe), Sam Williams (Big Sam’s Funky Nation), and Rahzel (The Roots) graced the stage with their flute and saxophone, trombone and beat boxing, respectively.

The organ-based jazz trio kicked off their set with “Steppin,” off their 2010 Live at the Blue Note Tokyo album and “Uncle Junior,” 2007 Get Down album. As the three core leaders of Bowlive, they immediately established that there would be no slowing down. By the middle of “Aladdin,” all three men on stage were fully invested.  Krasno was taking his solos at the edge of the stage, sometimes rising onto his toes, while Neal Evans dominated the song with his bass keys and organ play and Alan Evans slammed his drums with ferocity.

Karl Denson (Photo by Phrazz)

Karl Denson (Photo by Phrazz)

Karl Denson was announced as the audience was told that he “just got off a plane and walked on this stage.”  Karl Denson is one of the hardest working musicians in the business and his passion for his craft drips off every note he plays. He is a fast, funky band leader who is always consistent in his delivery.  “The Swamp” and “Rudy’s Way” followed with Denson choosing to add his flute to the beautifully composed songs.  The addition of Karl’s flute to the sound of our favorite trio added another dimension of emotion to the songs.  They continued with “Shaheed,” off their 2001 album Doin’ Something where Karl’s flute provided a softness to the hard-edged song. Krasno raged his guitar till the strings broke and had to change to a new guitar and Neal Evans kicked a drum solo into the audience’s guts.

Alan Evans, Karl Denson, Big Sam, and Eric Krasno (Photo by Phrazz)

Alan Evans, Karl Denson, Big Sam, Eric Krasno & Nigel Hall (Photo by Phrazz)

Joining the foursome on stage next was Nigel Hall (The Warren Haynes Band) and Sam Williams (Big Sam’s Funky Nation). There can be no doubt that the danceable and excitable energy that Big Sam brings is something you can’t find in many artists. The New Orleans native, formerly the trombonist for the Dirty Dozen Brass Band, danced out on stage with his horn, picked up a stage prop that he had brought (his stuffed sheep named Harmony) and began to dance all around the stage. Nigel and Big Sam began grooving it together and the entire audience couldn’t help but beam over the energy of it all.  These are serious performances but it’s ALWAYS appropriate to have a good time and with just his presence; Big Sam will lift any crowd. The powerhouse of funk on stage slowed the rage down for the soulful, “Leave Me Alone,” sung by Hall. Karl Denson changed to his saxophone and kicked us a lightning fast solo to end the set.

Rage (Photo by Phrazz)

Rage (Photo by Phrazz)

Rahzel Set Break Set (Photo by Phrazz)

Rahzel Set Break Set (Photo by Phrazz)

Straying from the formula of the first two nights, during this set break the audience would not be staring at an empty stage waiting for the first set to start. Instead, Beat Boxer Rahzel, the “Godfather of Noyze,” came out to keep them engaged.  Watching the audience react to this amazing addition to the night was almost as exciting as watching Rahzel. Specialize in the “fifth element of hip-hop,” Rahzel’s instrument is himself and a microphone.  He is a vocal percussionist who uses his breath, mouth and body to imitate sounds, instruments and voices.  He projected unmistakable beats from the Wu-Tang Clan and Run DMC. He became a DJ scratching records, created a buzzing insect around his head and brought Optimus Prime (Transforms) to life on stage with his robotic sounds. His signature song, “If Your Mother Only Knew” is always the highlight of a Rahzel performance. Rahzel simultaneously sings the lyrics and works the beats. It is quite difficult to even comprehend how Rahzel does what he does!  AMAZING!

Rubber Soulive Album

Rubber Soulive Album

Before Beatle Mania could kick off the first set, Soulive joined Rahzel on stage and performed “I Am the Magnificent” and it was just that, magnificent.  The entire first half of the second set consisting of songs chosen off Soulive’s latest album, Rubber Soulive.  “Come Together,” “Eleanor Rigby,” and I Want You (She’s So Heavy).” The audience sang along to the first song while the psychedelic lights and trippy sounds emanating off stage for “She’s So Heavy” was reinvented through the jazz trio.

Karl Denson, Big Sam, Nigel Hall and Lenesha Randolph (Photo by Phrazz)

Karl Denson, Big Sam, Nigel Hall and Lenesha Randolph (Photo by Phrazz)

Questlove (Photo by Phrazz)

Questlove (Photo by Phrazz)

Big Sam, Karl Denson, Nigel Hall and now, Lenesha Randolph (Robert Randolph and the Family Band) joined the stage for “Too Much.” Randolph and Hall sang the up-beat tune while Karl and Big Sam took their turn at the mic delivering some of the hardest, funkiest horn solos that Bowlive audiences will experience this run.  They kept up the pace with Stevie Wonder’s “Signed, Sealed, Delivered” and Questlove (The Roots) replacing Alan Evans, who picked up a guitar.

Full Stage Rage (Photo by Phrazz)

Full Stage Rage (Photo by Phrazz)

The entire crew of Soulive and their special guests kicked off the end of the set with “Tuesday Night Squad.”  Big Sam dominated a 3 minute long trombone rage, Alan was back on killin it on the drums, Nigel was on the Bongos before heading over to Neal where the pair did a little dance, if you will, shifting back and forth past each other to manipulate the various levels of keys that Neal’s kit provides.  Hall sang James Brown’s “Beweildered,” a deep, soulful song that required Nigel to reach the top of his range, and then he walked off stage.  It was back into “Tuesday Night Squad” to close the set.

Nigel and Neal Rage the Boards (Photo by Phrazz)

Nigel and Neal Rage the Boards (Photo by Phrazz)

There was never really an encore because every musician on stage was so into the music and feeling the audience’s energy that they chose to just play through and give their fans that extra five minutes of music that every audience desires.

Download Night 3 Sound Board Audio Here!

In three days Bowlive III had now brought us jazz, soul, psychedelic rock, New Orleans funk, hip-hop and southern-style blues in only three nights. The following evening, the party continued with Karl Denson sticking around for a second night and Jennifer Hartswick (Trey Anastasio Band) joining with her funky trumpet and soulful voice.

Pictures by Phrazz

Videos by: I can’t believe there are no videos for this entire night. If anyone finds some, send them my way

Words by The Tiny Rager

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