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Posts Tagged ‘Dino Perrucci Photography’

The Funky Meters (Photo by Dino Perrucci)

The Funky Meters (Photo by Dino Perrucci)

Three Nights of The Funky Meters @ The Brooklyn Bowl (01.15-17.11)

This was an event!  In the same spirit as Phanatics travel to Coventry for three nights of Phish, died hard Meters fans traveled far and wide to witness The Funky Meters magic occur over a span of three nights at the beloved Brooklyn Bowl in Brooklyn, NY.

For having never been to New York, I have never felt more at home in a brand new place. I can’t help but compare the room to the Rock N Bowl in New Orleans, a similar venue with a bowling alley and large stage for music, but this room has a great layout. A bar in the back, with a large dance floor area, the stage straight ahead. And to the side, a few steps up, rows of bowling lanes, with a walkway in front, providing a side stage vantage that lets one really feel like part of the performance. Everywhere you stand, there is a great vantage point of the stage, the lighting is good and the sound quality anywhere in the room was great too. ~ NOLA resident, Ananda Atmore

George Porter Jr. (Photo by Jeffrey Dupuis)

George Porter Jr. (Photo by Jeffrey Dupuis)

Back in 1967, Art “Poppa Funk” Neville collected a funky gang of New Orleans musicians who would come to be known as The Meters, .  George Porter Jr. played bass, Art “Poppa Funk” Neville played keys, Joseph (Zigaboo) Modeliste on drums and Leo Nocentelli on guitar! In 1977, they called it quits, leaving behind a musical legacy cementing them as Funk pioneers.

Russel Batiste (Photo by Jeffrey Dupuis)

Once the group disbanded, Art “Poppa Funk” Neville joined with his brothers performing as The Neville Brothers while George Porter Jr. founded PBS, or Porter, Batiste and Stolz.  Since The Neville Brothers were not touring this season, Art Neville was openly available to hit the road with The Funky Meters, who are the members of PBS with the addition of Art “Poppa Funk” Neville.

Art “Poppa Funk” Neville – Keys
George Porter, Jr. – Bass
Brian Stoltz – Guitar
Russell Batiste, Jr. – Drums

Brian Stolz (Photo by Dino Perrucci)

Brian Stoltz (Photo by Dino Perrucci)

It had been three years since The Funky Meters last played together. When Brian Stoltz isn’t wowing the audience with his shredding guitar style with The Funky Meters, Ian Neville holds the guitar spot. Essentially, in the middle of all these Meters heads were PBS fans and EVERYONE was a George Porter Jr. fan! But, honestly, who doesn’t love George Porter Jr.?  Go check my facebook info under “religion”, you’ll find George Porter Jr.‘s name stands alone!

(Photo by Dino Perrucci)

(Photo by Dino Perrucci)

The Funky Meters (02.15.11)

Art “Poppa Funk” Neville – Keys
George Porter, Jr. – Bass
Brian Stoltz – Guitar
Russell Batiste, Jr. – Drums

(Photo by Jeffrey Dupuis)

(Photo by Jeffrey Dupuis)

I was lucky enough to have the wonderful New Orleans photographer Jeffrey Dupuis (Jeffrey Dupuis Photography) as a house guest for the three night run.  We arrived in Brooklyn just in time to grab something to eat some scrumptious $3.50 falafel sandwiches at Oasis, one of my favorite spots to hit before heading to The Brooklyn Bowl.

The turn out for a Tuesday night was exactly what we thought it would be. The venue was no where near sold out but the place was full of people who knew what was going to take place on stage that night. And what a great warm-up performance it was.

(Photo by Jeffrey Dupuis)

(Photo by Jeffrey Dupuis)

(Photo by Jeffrey Dupuis)

(Photo by Jeffrey Dupuis)

As they took the stage, each member had a blazing smile on their face and the audience was wild with applause. George Porter Jr. notices a couple in the audience wearing a “George Matters” tie-dyed tee shirt, the same shirt they had personally created and gifted to him many moons ago.  “I recognize that shirt,” he states as he starts the first jam, which was so unbelievably funky.

The following four songs were from The Meters catalog.  “The World” brought the funk full throttle as Brian Stoltz reminded me how much I had missed seeing him perform.  He is truly superb with his rock-driven funk guitar styling. “Fire on The Bayou” and “Change/Reform”  had the entire audience singing as they were the most recognizable Meters songs performed that night.  Porter growled deeply into the microphone as they pounded out a wonderful “Here Comes the Jungle Man” that book-ended a “They Don’t Know” tease.

The noticeable covers of the night were Lee Dorsey‘s “Get Out of My Life, Woman”, Professor Longhair‘s “Going to Mardi Gras” and Tom Waits‘s “Way Down in the Hole”. Porter and Russell Batiste, Jr. both pulled out solos that earned their own spot in the set list! Art showed his age but with a smile on his face, he played through with energy and had a few golden moments himself.

Best reason to do three nights: Rare Songs ~ NOLA Photographer Jeffrey Dupuis

In the end, we were given almost two hours of pure Funky Meters gold and we all walked out of The Brooklyn Bowl terribly excited and putting together our wish list for tomorrow night’s set list!

Set List – Night I
A Jam*
The World Is A Little Under The Weather >
Chicken Strut >
…Fire On The Bayou >
Cardova >
Get Out Of My Life Woman >
Here Come’s The Jungle Man >
They Don’t Know (tease) >
Here Come’s The Jungle Man >
Change/Reform >
Hang ‘Em High >
Africa >
Going To Mardi Gras >
Cabbage Alley >
Going To Mardi Gras >
Porter’s bass solo >
Way Down in The Hole >
Russel Drum Clinic>
Just Kissed My Baby
Porter’s bass solo >
Just Kissed My Baby >
It Ain’t No Use

* Art sings Billy Jean (Michael Jackson)

(Photo by Dino Perrucci)

(Photo by Dino Perrucci)

The Funky Meters (02.16.11)

Art “Poppa Funk” Neville – Keys
George Porter, Jr. – Bass
Brian Stoltz – Guitar
Russell Batiste, Jr. – Drums

Special Guests:
Nigel Hall– Vocals/Keys
Eric Krasno – Guitar
Adam Deitch – Drums

(Photo by Jeffrey Dupuis)

(Photo by Jeffrey Dupuis)

The second night had more of a turn out.  People had heard the buzz about the previous night and the venue was now 60-70% full.  My girlfriend, Ananda, was flying in from NOLA directly to the show.  As she flew towards us to the airport, my NYC crew and I hightailed it from Rockwood Music Hall after watching Nigel Hall Band perform on their quaint stage.  We all had our rage faces on as there would also be a third show we would be hitting after The Funky Meters.  As well, we had the knowledge of knowing that the Nigel Hall Band would be joining The Funky Meters on stage later that night. The excitement was never ending.

I had flown in straight from New Orleans, made my way through the crowd of smiling faces. Instant reunion with Jam Cruisers, NOLA to NY music lovers and friends old and new. It was my turn to come to their town. Love was everywhere, and the hugs and smiles were abundant, on stage and off. ~ NOLA Resident, Ananda Atmore

Porter was wearing yet another form of tie-dye shirt and Batiste was in another sports jersey, this time white.  The boys don’t stray too much from their signature styles.  Just like their first night, they started off with songs from The Meters catalog with favorites like “Here Come The Meter Man” and “Look-Ka Py Py.”

(Photo by Jeffrey Dupuis)

(Photo by Jeffrey Dupuis)

The covers of the evening were Roger Miller‘s “Chug-A-Lug,” Professor Longhair‘s “Tipitinas” and “Big Chief.”  The encore gave us “Higher” and “Sing A Simple Song,” both  Sly and The Family Stone covers while “Them Changes” was a Buddy Miles tune made popular by Jimi Hendrix and Band of Gypsies. “Peace Pipe” has me a bit confused. A friend suggested it might be a Mardi Gras Indian song.

“Love Slip Up on Ya” is a song specific to The Funky Meters catalog and Brian Stoltz once again blasted us with his masterful guitar. “Ride Me Dunky,” also a Funky Meters tune, saw Porter giving us his deep bass lines.

Stepping off stage for only a few moments, the fellas came on stage to perform “Be My Lady.”  However, as amazing as they were alone, The Funky Meters show blasted out of  control when the Nigel Hall Band took the stage for the remainder of the three-part encore.  Nigel grabbed the microphone, Adam Deitch sat in on drums and Eric Krasno played a second guitar for Sly Stone’s “Sing A Simple Song” and “Higher.”

I heard the first few notes of a familiar song, and thought “could it be?”. Are they really going to play it? YES! It was “Be my Lady”! This is an old Meters song that I haven’t heard performed in several years now, and a long time favorite of mine. This was my golden musical moment, and hearing them perform this song made the whole trip worth it in one moment. ~ NOLA Resident Ananda Atmore

(Photo by Jeffrey Dupuis)

(Photo by Jeffrey Dupuis)

The energy on stage was palpable. Watching Eric Krasno play across from Brian Stoltz was magnificent.  Two of my favorite guitarists having so much fun with each other on stage. Russell Batiste, Jr. banging on a cowbell, dancing all over the stage as he helped knock the energy up to another level. Art “Poppa Funk” Neville needed key changes shouted out a few times and then he left Nigel Hall to take over as he walked away for a breather and took the time to dance around to the music.

(Photo by Jeffrey Dupuis)

(Photo by Jeffrey Dupuis)

The Royal Family remained on the stage with the The Funky Meters to close out the show! And what a show this was.  The second night had been pure fire!! It was off to the third show of the night: DJ Nutritious‘s Bembe rage with Nigel Hall and Stephen Chopek.

Download Link To The Funky Meters @ The Brooklyn Bowl (02.16.11)

Set list – Night II
Here Comes The Meter Man >
Look-Ka Py Py >
Too Funky >
Bass intro Too >
Chug A Lug
Love Slip Up On Ya
Keep on Marching (Funky Soldier)
That Ain’t The Way to Carry On
Funkify Your Life
My Baby
Tipitina’
Hoo Chie Coo
Ride Me Dunky/Soul Island
Message From The Meters
People Say
Bass Intro too >
Big Chief>
Peace Pipe

Encore
Be My Lady
Sing A Simple Song*
Higher*
Them Changes*
Cissy Strut – tease*

*w/guest Nigel Hall, Eric Krasno & Adam Deitch

(Photo by Jeffrey Dupuis)

(Photo by Jeffrey Dupuis)

The Funky Meters (02.17.11)

Art “Poppa Funk” Neville – Keys
George Porter, Jr. – Bass
Brian Stoltz – Guitar
Russell Batiste, Jr. – Drums

Special Guests:
Eric Krasno – Guitar
?uestlove – Drums
Nikie Glaspie – Drums

(Photo by Alison Murphy)

(Photo by Allison Murphy)

Here we were, the third night of The Funky Meters.  The house was packed and this time, I was going to rage front row, right under George Porter, Jr.. I had taken myself from the front of the stage the previous nights to write on the elevated side of The Brooklyn Bowl because I knew I would dance away from my responsibility of writing if I was up front. Again, he is my religion after all.

(Photo by Jeffrey Dupuis)

(Photo by Jeffrey Dupuis)

(Photo by Jeffrey Dupuis)

(Photo by Jeffrey Dupuis)

As I walked around the venue throughout the show, I ran into musicians like Nikie Glaspie who was utilizing a bowling with her friends.  Henry Butler was standing amongst the crowd with a huge smile on his face.  Joe Russo and Eric Krasno were watching from backstage while the owner himself, Pete Shapiro, positioned himself atop a speaker right on the side stage sucking the entire thing in with a beaming persona.

(Photo by Jeffrey Dupuis)

(Photo by Jeffrey Dupuis)

It started off the same as the nights previous.  Batiste was wearing another green jersey, Porter was in yet another tie-die, Stoltz was in a button up with a few hipped out accessories. I forgot to mention his Kenny Rogers look he’s raging this tour.  He pulls it off nicely! The tapers were out in full force.  Sadly, even though I saw tapers each night, the third night was the only recording that could be found. Enjoy!

Download Link To The Funky Meters @ The Brooklyn Bowl (02.17.11)

The funky foursome brought the heat immediately after a funky, funky warm-up jam got the night started right.  Porter had his feet firmly planted into the ground as he put the bass in our face front row.

(Photo by Jeffrey Dupuis)

(Photo by Jeffrey Dupuis)

The night was full of amazing, jamming covers.  We got “Rainy Day Women” by Bob Dylan, “9 to 5” by Dolly Parton and “Love the One Your With” by Crosby, Stills and Nash.

(Photo by Alison Murphy)

(Photo by Allison Murphy)

There was a KILLER Rock-a-billy vibe during “Big Boss Man”, a Luther Dixon song made famous by Jimmy Reed.  They ran through “Simple Song” again, the Sly cover from the previous night.  The crowd was on fire, singing along to everything, filling in the lyrics when Art couldn’t remember them as they barely got through The Allman Brothers‘ “Midnight Rider” where Stoltz saved the day with a ripping guitar solo.

We had a few repeats with “Funkify Your Life”, “Hoochie Coo”, “Fiyo On The Bayo”, “Junko Partner” and “Cabbage Alley” among others. All audience favorites that we didn’t mind hearing over and over again.  “Aiko Aiko,” a James Crawford song made famous by the one and only Dr. John had the place erupting with dancing feet.


(Photo by Jeffrey Dupuis)

(Photo by Jeffrey Dupuis)

The entire night was so high energy and the event was capping off such a full week of funky New Orleans Love, it was just outstanding. Towards the end of the night, Eric Krasno, Nikie Glaspie and ?uestlove joined the stage for a percussion driven rage. Batiste, Glaspie and ?uestlove took turns beating the drums, the cowbell and just about anything else they could find to hit within their reach.  Krasno was back on guitar facing off across Stoltz.

(Photo by Jeffrey Dupuis)

(Photo by Jeffrey Dupuis)

The encore saw Krasno leave the stage and then jump back on as they weren’t done with him yet. The wicked funky “Keep on Stretching Your Rubber Band” and “Audubon Zoo”, originally titled “All Asked For You” and changed by their manager, closed the three night run.

The 3rd night didn’t disappoint either. The set list speaks for itself really. They played again Sing a Simple Song, which had me on the front row jumping and smiling even more enthusiastically than before. And the encore of Keep on Stretching your rubber band. Pure Funky Meters magic. ~ NOLA Resident Ananda Atmore

The Funk Meter was off the charts this last night.  Even though watching The Funky Meters is similar to watching Furthur, in the respect that they aren’t spring chickens anymore, they brought the FIYO to the Brooklyn Bowl the past three nights.

(Photo by Alison Murphy)

(Photo by Allison Murphy)

I watched as all the men got up, gathered in the center of the stage and bowed before us.  Porter walked to the front of the stage and I got a smile and handshake from him as he continued down the line of people in the front row shaking hands and thanking the audience for coming. I might never wash this hand.

Alison Murphy caught Porter shaking my hand! (Photo by Alison Murphy)

Allison Murphy caught Porter shaking my hand! (Photo by Alison Murphy)

The final part of this musical adventure placed me upstairs in the backstage area, shaking hands, hugging and taking pictures with George Porter Jr.  It was a trio of nights that I will NEVER forget. I hope you enjoy(ed) the shows!!

Setlist: Night III
Jam >
Funky Miracle >
Funkify Your Life >
Rainy Day Women >
9 to 5
Hey Pocky Way >Cissy Strutt >
Love the one you’re with >
Hoochie Coo
He Bite Me (the Dragon) >
Voodoo Child* >
Fiyo on the Bayou >
Big Boss Man >
Aiko Aiko ^ >
Junko Partner >Midnight Rider >
Simple Song #  >
Cabbage Alley >
Baby What you want me to do >
Hey Pocky Way

Encore
(Keep on Stretching) your Rubber Band
Audubon Zoo (All asked for you)
* w/ Billy Jean (Michael Jackson) tease
^ w/ She’ll be coming round the mountain
# w/ Krasno, ?uestlove, Nikki Galaspie
(Photo by Jeffrey Dupuis)

(Photo by Jeffrey Dupuis)

Me and my Religion :) GPJR!!  (Photo by Ananda)

Me and my religion 🙂 GPJR!! (Photo by Ananda)

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Robben Ford, Toss Panos, Andy Hess & John Scofield @ The Blue Note (12.01.10)

Happy Birthday To Ali Greenberg!!  Ali made my night by picking a wonderful choice performance for her birthday celebration, choosing an intimate John Scofield and friends performance at the Blue Note in the East Village, NYC for a lovely Wednesday night of music.

On stage tonight was:

Robben Ford – Guitar & Vocals
Toss Panos – Drums
John Scofield – Guitar
Andy Hess – Bass

Robben Ford, Toss Panos, Andy Hess & John Scofield - The Blue Note, NYC 12110 (Photo by Dino Perrucci)

Robben Ford, Toss Panos, Andy Hess & John Scofield - The Blue Note, NYC (Photo by Dino Perrucci)

Video and pictures, other then professionals, were prohibited and as our crew arrived early, we were sitting pretty much directly on the stage and I was unable to get away with much.  Thank goodness for Dino Perrucci of Dino Perrucci Photography being present to capture a few moment on camera for us! The pictures throughout the article are his. THANKS DINO!!

I was excited to see tonight’s performance not so much for John Scofield this time but for Andy Hesss and specifically Robben FordRobben Ford is a five-time Grammy nominee and has played with artists as diverse as Joni Mitchell, Jimmy Witherspoon, Miles Davis, George Harrison, Phil Lesh, Bonnie Raitt, Claus Ogerman, Michael McDonald, Bob Dylan, John Mayall, Greg Allman and many others.

Robben Ford - The Blue Note, NYC 12110 (Photo by Dino Perrucci)

Robben Ford - The Blue Note, NYC 12110 (Photo by Dino Perrucci)

After the first song (unknown title), John Scofield introduced the members of his posse on stage.  There was a joke made then went into Traveling Riverside Blues, a Robert Johnson original made famous by Led Zepplin.  A JAMMING Good Morning Little School Girl was next, a song covered so many times that it has been acknowledged by the Blues Foundation Hall of Fame.

The joking continued throughout the night into the next song.  Robben Ford suggested that John had created this blues style song during their two day rehearsals in L.A. and he believed it didn’t have a name.

Yes! We practiced!Robben snickered.

Scofield responds, “Yeah, you have to rehearse the blues.  And actually, the song does have a name and it’s called Slow Blues in F Sharp. ”

It’s in the second fret,”  jokes Scofield to Robben, the audience half gasping, half laughing. “Just kidding! He knows what he is doing!

Robben Ford & John Scofield - The Blue Note, NYC 12110 (Photo by Dino Perrucci)

Robben Ford & John Scofield - The Blue Note, NYC 12110 (Photo by Dino Perrucci)

Andy Hess, ex-bass player for Gov’t Mule, ripped his spot the entire set.  Being that I was positioned directly under Scofield, hoping not to get sweat dripped on me as the place was scorching hot, Andy was blocked most of the set but his strings stood out in each song. My ears kept being drawn to his style of playing.  I found their song choices for the evening fun and feisty as opposed to some stiff jazz performance. The boys had fun in that short window of music.

John Scofield - The Blue Note, NYC 12110 (Photo by Dino Perrucci)

John Scofield - The Blue Note, NYC 12110 (Photo by Dino Perrucci)

Sadly, the set only last a little over an hour, one hour and seven minutes to be exact.  Having to pay $35 to be seated at The Blue Note plus having a $5 minimum at your seat (which really means another $10 plus tip as nothing costs $5.00), brought the bill up and I expected more music for that price, especially since the following set didn’t begin until 10:30pm.  I felt a bit slighted, not going to lie.  AND you have to pay again to view the second set.  Alas…it was annoying but it was worth it regardless.  A nice birthday celebration with friends over a show is never something to complain about 🙂

The crew on stage debated over the next song.  Lovin’ Cup was “on thier list” so they choose that one. John Scofield talked about how he and Robben were fourteen years old together back in 1966 and loved this song.

Aside from the short length of the performance, it was a nice quick bite of music for a Wednesday night.  Can’t go wrong with that 🙂  Everyone should check out Robben Ford when you get a chance.  The guy wails.

Set list: Unknown First song, Traveling Riverside Blues, Good Morning Little School Girl, Slow Blues in F-Sharp, Lovin’ Cup

John Scofield - The Blue Note, NYC 12110 (Photo by Dino Perrucci)

John Scofield - The Blue Note, NYC 12110 (Photo by Dino Perrucci)

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” We Wish You Were Here” ~ Allen Woody Benefit ~

Allen Woody

Allen Woody

An absolutely historical night of music.  A bitter-sweet night of music.  A magical combination of guitar-shredding artists who came together for the memory of one man. Allen Woody!

Allen Woody!! For those of us who tend to seek out a bass line in a song, the name Allen Woody should register in your brain’s musical library.  Specifically, in the southern rock genre. He was the stand-out bassist for bands such as The Allman Brothers Band, Gov’t Mule, The Artimus Pyle Band and more.

Allen Woody

Allen Woody

His unexpected passing on August 26, 2000 encouraged his fellow musicians to hold the first benefit called One For Woody in September 2000.  Tonight, ten years later, Warren Haynes and an ARSENAL of guitar-wielding friends put together the second benefit for this greatly missed musician: Another One For Woody: “Wish You Were Here!”

This was a man whose musical presence touched the lives of numerous musicians, inspired a genre and who’s musical contribution deserves recognition.  Tonight, people paid over $140 a ticket to pay homage to this dearly missed bass player whose tragically early departure from music left a gaping whole in the sound of southern rock.  The proceeds from this 10th Anniversary event went to raising money for musical education in schools.  For every person we heard complaining about the price, we politely reminded them of this fact.  Having just had the privilege of attending T-Bone Burnett’s “Waiting For Superman” Benefit at The Beacon (click for my review) a few weeks earlier, it is safe to say that the quest for keeping music & art in the school system is not going to ever be ignored. We are all soldiers in that fight.

“It’s too loud? Too fuckin’ bad” -Allen Woody 4/4/96

Roseland Ballroom

Roseland Ballroom

Arriving at 6:45pm, I had quibbled with my man over arriving to the venue early. He didn’t want to stand around for hours and I wanted to make sure we had ample time to arrive early enough for good viewing locations.  Roseland Ballroom is one of those venues, like Terminal 5, that has a sardine-like feeling with horrible site lines due to low ceilings and poor design.  Doors were meant to open at 6pm but didn’t open until after 7pm.  When we arrived, the line to the venue was wrapped completely around the block. Of course, even being an hour early, we were still slightly late but the first of our friends. Our section of the line starting to bulge as more friends joined our space.

Dino Perucci (Dino Perrucci Photography) and Allison Murphy (Allison Murphy Photography), two of my favorite NY based photographers, were walking the front of the stage.  My smile swelled because I knew that I didn’t need my camera tonight.  Throughout this article, many of the pictures you will see are shots through their lens.  Thanks to both photographers for allowing this Tiny Raging blogger to stand there and take it all in, not having to worry about the pictures.  And thank you, not simply for this show, but for the hundreds you do every year. Thank you, from all the people who admire your talent and work, for doing what you do and bringing the music to our eyes.

The show was supposed to start at 7pm and the doors didn’t even open until after 7pm.  After a lovely chat with the lovely Allison Murphy while the unusually long sound check and stage set-up it seemed about that time.  Those of us in the front were debating which musicians would be standing/sitting/playing where.  As long as I could see a full-on shot of Derek Trucks, Warren Haynes and Luther Dickinson, I didn’t care where I was standing.

Warren Haynes Acoustic Set

Warren Haynes – Guitar
Edwin McCain – Guitar
Kevin Kinney – Guitar

Out walks Warren Haynes with two other musicians that I am unsure of.  It wasn’t until maybe an hour later that I found out that the men were Edwin McCain and Kevin Kinney. This was the acoustic set and it was beautiful.

As soon as Warren Haynes started his strumming into Kevin Kinney‘s Just Outside Of Heaven (A Good Country Mile), I got that religious swell that I sometimes reach when the beauty of the music overwhelms me.  This time, it was just as much the energy in the room as the music.  I looked behind me and saw the faces of all my friends just beaming with excitement and love.  Edwin McCain sang The Lucky One.  All three sang on a gorgeous rendition of I Shall Be Released.

Set: Just Outside Of Heaven (A Good Country Mile), The Lucky One, I Shall Be Released

North Mississippi Allstars Duo

Luther Dickinson – Guitar & Vocals
Cody Dickinson – Drums, & Electric Washboard

Special Guests:

Gordie Johnson (Big Sugar) – Guitar
Artimis Pyle (Lynyrd Skynyrd) – Drums
Danny Louis (Gov’t Mule) – Keys
Audley Freed (Cry of Love) – Guitar

Around 8:15pm, the Dickinson Brothers,  tonight calling themselves the North Mississippi Allstars Duo, took the stage.  The Dickinson family had a wonderful connection to Allen Woody over the years.  The late Jim Dickinson, the Duo’s father, was good friends with the members of the Allman Brothers Band back in the day and when the North Mississippi Allstars toured with Gov’t Mule, they have fond memories of Allen Woody sitting in with them.

Warren Haynes + Gordie Johnson (Photo by Allison Murphy)

Warren Haynes + Gordie Johnson (Photo by Allison Murphy)

The Brothers Dickinson brought the Memphis blues to our ears with Sitting On Top of the World, a 1930’s standard. The gospel tone came out with Shimmy She Wobble > Station Blues > Preachin’ Blues, all North Mississippi Allstars originals.  It was at this time that standing in front of the speakers began to take effect and I had to pop in the ear plugs.  It never fails and as usual, I ended up passing out the rest to friends and strangers around me who were clearly in need.

And then it was time for the guests.  Gordie Johnson, Big Sugar guitarist and recent Gov’t Mule producer, came out to join the Duo for Po Black Maddie. Initially, it looked as though Gordie was going to sing the song but it almost appeared as if he was unsure of the words.  Did anyone else catch this mumbling into the microphone?? Luther ended up singing the song.


Hook Herrera, Warren Haynes + Luther Dickinson (Allison Murphy)

Hook Herrera, Warren Haynes + Luther Dickinson (Allison Murphy)

Gordie Johnson remained for Straight to Hell. Cody Dickinson‘s smile never left his face the entire set.  It almost looked plastered on but we all know he was truly happy. How could anyone not be?  There was a stand-alone drum solo by Cody Dickinson while Luther and Gordie Johnson switch sides of the stage for the final song of the set.

The end of their set was FIRE!!  The Duo welcomed Artimis Pyle (Lynyrd Skynyrd) on drums, Danny Louis (Gov’t Mule) on keys and Audley Freed (Cry of Love & the Black Crowes) to the stage to perform Whiskey Rock A Rolla! There was now an arsenal of musicians on the stage to sing about whiskey and rock-n-roll! Four guitarists as Cody Dickinson moved from his drums to a guitar, tambourines, keyboards…What a mess of Southern rednecks.  Their vests, boots, long stringy hair, cowboy hats…all screaming of their bluesy country background.


Set: Sitting On Top of the World, Shimmy She Wobble > Station Blues > Preachin’ Blues, Glory Glory, Po Black Maddie, Straight To Hell, Whiskey Rockin Rolla

Gov’t Mule

Warren Haynes – Guitar & Vocals
Matt Abts – Drums
Danny Louis – Keyboards, Background Vocals and Other Goodies
Jorgen Carlsson – Bass

Special Guests:

Gordie Johnson (Big Sugar) – Guitar
Jim Loughlin (moe)- Drums
Vinnie Amico (moe) Drums
Chuck Garvey (moe) – Guitar
Hook Herrera – Harmonica
Luther Dickinson – Guitar & Vocals
Cody Dickinson – Drums, & Electric Washboard
Artemis Pyle (Lynyrd Skynyrd) Drums
Rich Robinson (Black Crowes) – Guitar
Robert Kearns (Cry of Love) – Bass
Audley Freed (Black Crowes) – Guitar
Savannah Woody – Vocals

The members of Gov’t Mule take the stage after a few minutes of stage setting. Warren‘s iconic raspy voice heads into Railroad Boy. The screen behind the band was projecting a black background with “GOT MULE?” plastered across in white. Warren ripped a solo and the set just launched into southern goodness at its best.

There was a spacey rip into Blind Man in the Dark, a personal favorite to sing around my apartment. Warren asked us how we were feeling and the place erupted with a happy reply.  Danny Louis jumped off the keys and onto guitar for Steppin’ Lightly.  At this point, there were old picture of Woody shooting or lingering across the screen behind the band. His face smiling at us, showing his appreciation for the music in front of him.

Sometimes there is nothing better then watching the hands of your favorite guitar player.  Personally, my favorite guitar player had not yet hit the stage but here in front of me was Warren.  He is simply amazing.  Watching Warren, I was in tune with his hands much more then usual.  I equate that to the fact that I have never been this close to his hands before. I was so happy to be in the front row. Banks of the Deep End sprang out of his hands and so it went…full on Warren!

And now it was time for some GUESTS!!!  Gordie Johnson once again joined the stage, this time followed by Jim Loughlin & Vinnie Amico, the drummers from Moe.  They raged I’m A Ram before jamming into Dear Prudence where Chuck Garvey, also of  Moe, joined with his guitar. I LOVE Moe.

Warren Haynes + Chuck Garvey (Photo by Allison Murphy)

Warren Haynes + Chuck Garvey (Photo by Allison Murphy)

Dear Prudence with the members of Moe.  AWESOME! THIS little addition to the stage made me very VERY happy.  Seeing Chuck on stage with Warren was interesting.  Their sounds are so different so vibing them together was great even though I silently wished it had been Al who was joining the stage.   Chuck lead while Warren sang. There were whimsy art paintings across the screen behind the stage.  Chuck gave a great solo and then tagged in Luther.

Warren Haynes + Hook Herrera (Photo by Allsion Murphy)

Warren Haynes + Hook Herrera (Photo by Allsion Murphy)

The 320 Blues saw Hook Herrera join the stage with his mighty harmonica.  Oh, the harmonica. I LOOOOOOOOOVE the layer of sound a harmonica add to a musical journey.  As well,  Luther and Cody Dickinson joined the stage followed by Artemis Pyle (Lynyrd Skynyrd).  GOD! It just kept getting better and better! So many musicians had been touched by Allen’s friendship, music and memory.  Cody busted out his washboard and I finally heard the North Mississippi Allstars sound that I associate so much to that washboard.  The place was on FIRE!! and the music was so loud and vibrant that the musicians drinks were shaking off the amps.   As far as energy was concerned, this was the pop-off song of the night, so far.

Audley Freed + Robert Kearns (Photo by Allison Murphy)

Audley Freed + Robert Kearns (Photo by Allison Murphy)

Warren then spoke of how Big Sugar used to open for Gov’t Mule and how he and Allen Woody would rage this Al Green song. He welcomed Rich Robinson (Black Crowes) to the stage for Stay With Me, Rick’s slide guitar sound melting everyone’s ears.  Danny Louis was back on his keyboard.  This song was so pretty.  Warren ripped a solo and then they all hugged. The next song saw Rich Robinson staying on stage and being joined by Robert Kearns (Cry of Love) replacing Jorgen Carlsson on bass and Artemis Pyle (Lynyrd Skynyrd) jumping on drums.  They flew into Sometimes Salvation, a Black Crowes cover, and the venue cheered.

Simple Man was next.  I love this song. It never gets old for me. Matt Abts left the stage this time leaving only Artemis Pyle to play the drums. Audley Freed was back out on guitar and so they went…


Warren Haynes + Savannah Woody (Photo by Allison Murphy)

Warren Haynes + Savannah Woody (Photo by Allison Murphy)

Wishing Well was next with the same people gracing the stage. And then we were given an emotional surprise. Savannah Woody, Allen Woody’s daughter, came out to the front of the stage to sing Soul Shine. And  she sang the line:  Now you gotta let your soul Shine / Just like my daddy used to say...the entire place erupted with the longest loudest cheer of the night and Warren’s tears took over the gleam in his eye.  It took some time for people to realize who Savannah Woody was but when she sang that line, I knew immediately that it must be SOME kind of close relative to Woody.

During the song, she was standing on stage, arms dangling while solos were being taken.  A stage hand brought out a tambourine in the cutest way but she still didn’t move that much.

Warren Haynes + Savannah Woody (Photo by Allison Murphy)

Warren Haynes + Savannah Woody (Photo by Allison Murphy)

When Allen died, a fund for Savannah’s education was established in his memory. She didn’t look any older then a high school student and it made me sad to know she lost her father so young. But the fact that she was up there, singing in her father’s memory, and not crying…we knew she was a strong. Certainly stronger then me as I teared up once I realized who she was and what she meant to the show.  It must feel wonderful to see that your father touched so many lives.  It must be wonderful to know that all those amazing guitar legends up on stage were actually men who look after their own and I am sure have taken her under their wing over the years.  It was a lovely and touching performance of an otherwise tedious song.

This show was supposed to end at 11:50pm, due to city/venue rules.  This set ended at 11:30pm and we KNEW that we were not going anywhere for sometime because now….it was time for The Allman Brothers Band, but not before almost a 40 minute set break.

Set List: Railroad Boy > Blind Man In The Dark, Steppin’ Lightly, Banks Of The Deep End, I’m A Ram (with Gordie Johnson, Jim Loughlin & Vinnie Amico), Dear Prudence (with Chuck Garvey, Jim Loughlin & Vinnie Amico), 32/20 Blues (with Hook Herrera, Luther Dickinson, Cody Dickinson & Artemis Pyle), Stay With Me (with Rich Robinson & Artemis Pyle), Sometimes Salvation (with Rich Robinson, Robert Kearns & Artemis Pyle, without Jorgen Carlsson), Simple Man (with Artemis Pyle, Audley Freed & Robert Kearns, without Matt Abts & Jorgen Carlsson),Wishing Well (with Artemis Pyle & Audley Freed), Soulshine (with Savannah Woody & Artemis Pyle)

The Allman Brothers Band

Gregg Allman – Keys
Butch Trucks – Drums
Jai Johanny “Jaimoe” Johanson – Percussion
Warren Haynes – Guitar
Marc Quiñones – Percussion
Oteil Burbridge – Bass
Derek Trucks – Guitar

Special Guests:

Hook Herrera – Harmonica
Rich Robinson (Black Crowes) – Guitar
Artemis Pyle (Lynyrd Skynyrd) Drums
Berry Oakley, Jr. (Bloodline, OKB) – Guitar
Audley Freed (Black Crowes) – Guitar
Chuck Garvey (moe) – Guitar
Danny Louis – Keyboards, Background Vocals
Vinnie Amico (moe) Drums
Jim Loughlin (moe)- Drums
Luther Dickinson – Guitar & Vocals
Cody Dickinson – Drums, & Electric Washboard
Matt Abts – Drums

The set break must have last over 40 minutes.  Sadly, my date for the evening felt the weight of the tiresome day during the obsessively long break and had to leave.  A set that was supposed to end at 11:40pm and didn’t even start until at least midnight.  This was insane but I only knew good things would come from those of us who had been standing on our feet for over five hours at this point.

Allman Brothers Band, Warren Haynes + Derek Trucks (Photo by Allison Murphy)

Allman Brothers Band, Warren Haynes + Derek Trucks (Photo by Allison Murphy)

When the music final started, my feet were aching, I was missing my date and fighting to hold my place up in the front row.  The masses pushed even closer as Derek entered the stage.  And for the first time since I was able to meet him on his tour bus during Mountain Jam (click to read), I was back into a super fan.  My legs buckled at first site, my smile exploded out the side of my face and I screamed like one of those chicks who faint when seeing the Beatles or Justin Beiber.  Derek-Mania was going through my entire body.  He is the one musician that makes me completely lose control.

Derek Trucks + Marc Quinones  (Photo by Allison Murphy)

Derek Trucks + Marc Quinones (Photo by Allison Murphy)

At this point, I am afraid I won’t be doing a great job of writing out exactly what went down.  Like I said, I get a little more then weak in the knees when I see Derek Trucks and stopping to takes notes or trying to recall everything when all I want to be doing is staring at his fingers, well…..I didn’t write much at all.

First, the overly handsome Oteil Burbridge joins the stage, followed by Warren Haynes and Gregg Allman who wander to their respective instruments.  It didn’t take more then 60 seconds for the rest of the members of The Allman Brothers Band, including Marc Quiñones on percussion, to lock into place and blast right into Don’t Want You No More, the first song on the first Allman Brothers album and an instrumental that was originally recorded by The Spencer Davis Group in 1967.  All I wrote in my notes is “Ok, I just need to dance now.”

Gregg Allman continued striking the keys and singing into This is Not My Cross to Bear, a song Greg wrote about an old girlfriend.  Both Derek and Warren were given ample time to release their talents through solos during this song so be sure to watch.  And as you watch Derek smile towards the camera right in the beginning of the following video, you can be sure he is smiling at me.  Oh yes!  To be sure **wink**

End of the Line was next.  Warren changed out his guitars for this one and ripped out an astounding solo.  Sometimes I just don’t understand how things can sound so different with every show.  Same style but soooo different in sounds.  At this point it is still only the members of The Allman Brothers Band gracing the stage and it proceeded that way for the following 5 songs.

Greg Allman + Danny Louis (Photo by Allison Murphy)

Greg Allman + Danny Louis (Photo by Allison Murphy)

So at this point, there is a lull in the sound throughout the audience and I catch myself SCREAMING like one of those Beatles Mania fans again: “DEREK I LOOOOOOOOVE YOU!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!.”  No One Left To Run With was next, one of the few songs Dickey Betts wrote for the group but never sang.

Fun fact: This song was included on the 2002 compilation CD Mullets Rock!. For a while, The Allman Brothers were prime offenders of the haircut that was “Business in the front, party in the back.”

There was a gnarly guitar duel between Warren and Derek.  I mean it just never ends with these two.  Warren was  presenting us with such a phenomenal night of music and he was the ONLY musician to play in almost every song and at least in ever set.  He was the hardest working man in show buisness that night!  The drums in this song were killer.

Black Hearted Woman, also a song written by Gregg Allman about the same woman he wrote This is Not My Cross to Bear about, followed and continued right into Other One Jam, a Grateful Dead cover, until they begin inviting out the guests!!! Greg sang his heart out and the video shows it!


Hook Herrera came out and joined the boys for Who’s Been Talking. That man is an absolutely phenomenal harmonica player. I’ve said it a million times but I LOVE THAT INSTRUMENT. You can’t get a sound from any other instrument the way a sound is produced through a harmonica. It’s just soulful and the epitome of the blues to this southern gal.

Artimus Pyle + Audley Freed (Photo by Allison Murphy)

Artimus Pyle + Audley Freed (Photo by Allison Murphy)

Midnight Rider, a crowd favorite,followed.  Now, the original version of the song was with Duane Allman playing.  I believe  Gregg Allman re-made it a few years later (correct me if I am wrong).  If you listen to older recordings, you can hear and feel Duane and Dickeys’ opposing styles very well. So amazing.  Also, in 2005, this was used in the opening credits of Rob Zombie‘s horror flick The Devil’s Rejects.  Who doesn’t love that kind of product placement!?

Midnight Rider was followed by One Way Out. This song welcomed out Rich Robinson, Berry Oakley Jr. & Artemis Pyle to the stage.  I don’t know why but the videographers apparently must have run out of time or video because the Allman Brothers YouTube videos begin dying off around this point.

Warren Haynes + Berry Oakley Jr (Photo by Allison Murphy)

Warren Haynes + Berry Oakley Jr (Photo by Allison Murphy)

Statesboro Blues saw all guests leave the stage except for Berry Oakley Jr..  Berry Oakley Jr. is the son of Berry Oakley, a founding member and original bass player for The Allman Brothers Band who sadly passed away in 1972.  It was a tribute for many people this evening and I was hoping people recognized the significance.   Berry Oakley, Jr. left the stage and was replaced by Audley Freed & Danny Louis on guitar and keys respectively for The Band‘s The Weight.

Chuck Garvey, Jim Loughlin, Jimmy Vanderbogart & Vinnie Amico came out to join The Allmans during one of my all time favorite Grateful Dead songs, Franklin’s Tower. Got to be honest with you and admit I have NO CLUE who Jimmy Vanderbogart is and I can’t find any info online that can give me more insight – If you know, please comment.

Southbound followed with the addition of the Dickenson Brothers joining the crowd on stage along side Hook Herrera and Danny Louis.  This was one of my favorite songs of the set simply because it was The Allman Brothers with this North Mississippi Allstars Duo and a freaking harmonica.  SOUTHERN GREATNESS!!!

All guests exited the stage and a RAGING Whipping Post closed out the set.  Derek Trucks once again showing us he is the king of the slide guitar. Once again showing me that he is the king of kings in my world when it comes to the guitar.

Gordie Johnson (Photo by Allison Murphy)

Gordie Johnson (Photo by Allison Murphy)

As my girlfriend and I walked away, we realized it was almost 2am in the morning on a work night.  We discussed leaving before the encore and went to the restroom.  Coming back up from the basement bathrooms, we smiled at each other as we heard the   stage light up again.  We couldn’t leave.  Not this time.  Warren Haynes began strumming the chords to Pink Floyd’s Wish You Were Here. And without uttering a word, the entire venue began singing the lyrics.  Warren places his hand behind his ears and the venue sings louder.  Berry Oakley, Jr., Gordie Johnson, Danny Louis and Matt Abts joined the stage for the remainder of the song with images of Woody’s face flashing smiles across the screen behind them.  And I cried…for the third or fourth time that night.

Set List: Don’t Want You No More, Ain’t My Cross To Bear, End Of The Line, No One Left To Run With, Black Hearted Woman > Other One Jam, Who’s Been Talking, Midnight Rider, One Way Out, Statesboro Blues, The Weight, Franklin’s Tower, Southbound, Whipping Post

Encore: Wish You Were Here

What an amazing night of music!!  Simply amazing. The epitome of love and community within southern rock was found on that stage this night.  I truly wish I could offer you a free download but alas…..

Click here to DOWNLOAD/STREAM/LISTEN to the show!

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