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Soulive: Photograph Courtesy of Calabro Music

Soulive: Photograph Courtesy of Calabro Music

Bowlive V: Night I – Soulive feat. DJ Logic, Nigel Hall, The Shady Horns, Eddie Roberts, Adam Smirnoff and Questlove (03.13.14)

Hitting a milestone fifth year, Soulive is back for their annual “Bowlive” residency at the Brooklyn Bowl in Brooklyn, New York.

This is an outstanding achievement for Eric Krasno (guitar), Neal Evans (drums), and Alan Evans (Hammond B3 organ, bass keys, clavinet), who, over the past four years, have performed 40 nights of strong, energetic, exciting shows including musical collaborations with artists from all genres.  The jazz/funk trio’s “Bowlive” event is now  solidified as a staple in the land of famous musical NYC residencies. You can be certain that this year will not disappoint.

For a recording of the evening’s music, click here!

Photo Courtesy of Andrew H. WalkerNeilson BarnardRick Diamond, Getty Images

DMC, Talib Kweli, George Porter, Jr.: Photo Courtesy of Andrew H. Walker/Neilson Barnard/Rick Diamond, Getty Images

DJ Logic, Leroy Justice, Jon Cleary, Alan Evans Trio, The London Souls, WOLF! and Sonya Kitchell will open for Soulive over the eight night run. Special guests include Bowlive DMC (of Run DMC), Susan Tedeschi, John Scofield, Talib Kweli, Joe Russo, Marco Benevento, George Porter Jr., Bill Evans and more. All the while, the Shady Horns will be on point each night rounding out Soulive’s house band.

“Thank you Soulive. Thank you Brooklyn Bowl. Thank you Madison House. Thank you Peter Shapiro. Thank you Royal Family Records. Thank you. Thank you. Thank You.”  ~ K.D.

“There’s just something about Soulive at the Bowl that is so amazing. It’s like the old school Knicks at the Garden, with Nigel playing, John Starks firing up the crowd, and everyone just relaxed and amped at the same time.” ~ B.M.

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Opener

For the opening night of Bowlive V, turntablist DJ Logic (Project Logic, Zen of Logic, For No One in Particular, The Anomaly), was on hand spinning upbeat grooving, funky, soulful tunes. Logic is a standout DJ in the jam band scene and electronic jazz community. Working with latter-day jazz saints such as Vernon Reid and Medeski, Martin and Wood, Logic shares the same musical passion as the jamming musicians that he began performing with many moons ago. He relishes in the improvisational spirit of jazz and makes you want to shake your ass.

Set  1
So Live
Uncle Junior
Rudy’s Way
Cash’s Dream
Turn It Out
Brother Soul
Right On

Neal Evans: Photo Courtesy of Dani Barbieri

Neal Evans: Photo Courtesy of Dani Barbieri

Our favorite power trio took the stage at 9:30 pm. In previous years, there have been Mod dancers in the bowling lanes and other visually stimulating nuggets to aid the group in the residency kick-off. This year, there was no fanfare; nothing to distract the audience from what was truly important: the music.  The members of Soulive, dressed in their signature black suits, simply walked out on stage, smiles on their faces and after a few seconds of checking their instruments, went right into “SO LIVE!”

While at The Allman Brothers Band residency the previous night, Eric Krasno shared with me that they would be playing their first album, “Get Down” in its entirety. It took everything in my power not to blast this news out over the world wide web at that moment. However, yesterday, I couldn’t keep my mouth shut and spread the word to as many friends as I could because I knew that dropping this knowledge on them would draw those who were on the fence to the venue.

"Get Down!" Album Cover

“Get Down!” Album Cover

“Get Down” was recorded in 1998-99 and released in 2002. For many of us in the audience, we were transported to a time in our own musical history, when this CD was instrumental and meaningful in our daily lives. I was surrounded by friends and Soulive enthusiasts who couldn’t stop commenting on the power this album had on them when it was released. Having listened to the album for over a decade myself, nothing compared to the live musical experience we were about to be delivered.

The trio finished their first tune and Krasno took to the microphone. “We truly appreciate you guys being here,” he proclaimed as he began clapping, getting the audience involved. As we all clapped along to the beat, Alan Evan gave his first drum solo of the night, leading the boys into “Uncle Junior,” a major staple and fan favorite of the Soulive catalog. Neal Evans was on fire during this organ-driven tune.

“Cliff Robinson turned to me as Neal was grooving and said, “No matter how many times I hear these guys, it feels like the first time.” ~ G.F.

Only two songs into the set and it was outstanding. The animation of the guys on stage was infectious and it was evident that they were feeling great and on point. We would have been satisfied if it had remained just the three of them on stage but it wouldn’t be BOWLIVE without a certain someone. That someone was Mr. Nigel Hall, soul singer and keyboardist extraordinaire.

Alan Evans and Nigel Hall: Photo Courtesy of Mark Dershowitz

Alan Evans and Nigel Hall: Photo Courtesy of Mark Dershowitz

During the first Bowlive in 2010, The Nigel Hall Band opened for Soulive every single night. He is the one Bowlive veteran to play as a guest every year.  As the audience hollered, Alan Evans introduced Nigel Hall and shouted excitedly, “Get Down, Brother Nigel! Get Down!” It was now Nigel’s turn to shine, and while Krasno was twinkling away at the strings,  Nigel grabbed the microphone and said, “You guys just keep doing that while I tell a story.”  And with that he recalled his childhood memories of listening to “Get Down!” with his mother, while sitting on their porch in Washington DC, smoking weed. He continued on:

“The song I am about to play on has meant something to me for many years. I used to live in Bangor, Maine and I played in a band there. One time, we had a gig in Portland and while we drove from Bangor to Portland, we listened to this one song the entire two hour trip. When the gig was over, we drove back, listening to the same song for another two hours. We listened to that song for four hours. I have asked the guys (Soulive) to let me play it with them and they said, “No! No! No!,” until now. Do you know what this means to me, to my soul?” ~ Nigel Hall

Soulive & Nigel Hall: Photo Courtesy of Dani Barbieri

Soulive & Nigel Hall: Photo Courtesy of Dani Barbieri

And with that, Nigel Hall put his hand over his heart and then crushed “Cash’s Dream.” I don’t know where to begin praising Nigel Hall for his performance during this song. Having transplanted to New Orleans from New York City since Bowlive IV, Nigel Hall has clearly fine-tuned his talent on the keyboards. The speed at which he played; the precision on his runs over the keys. It was an outstanding solo and performance. The camaraderie on stage was ignited.

“The musical moment I enjoyed most was Soulive playing Cash’s Dream. Nigel sat in on this tune and told a touching introduction about listening to this tune in 1999 with his since deceased mother. They went on to play an amazing rendition of this song which I have never heard live with an awesome piano solo by Nigel.” ~ A.S.

“Five years ago when we saw Nigel Hall playing, he was good. He has always been good. But this performance…something has changed. He is AMAZING now.” ~ R.A.

After the song, Nigel high-fived his way off the stage as Alan spoke on how it was true that Soulive hasn’t played that song in a while and how playing these songs now brought back cherished memories.

My favorite part…is that they’re playing 15 year old songs for the nth time and Kraz is still marveling at how Neal is crushing the hand bass and Hammond. I just fucking love Bowlive. ~ B.M.

“Brother Soul” was next, bringing out DJ Logic and The Shady Horns, consisting of Eric Bloom (trumpet), Ryan Zoidis (saxophone) and James Casey (saxophone/percussion). Each of the horns took their turn soloing while DJ Logic scratched his turn tables, adding a great texture to the remaining songs.

Eddie Roberts and Eric Krasno: Photo Courtesy of TinyRager's phone!

Eddie Roberts and Eric Krasno: Photo Courtesy of TinyRager’s phone!

The big surprise for the end of the first set was the arrival of Eddie Roberts, guitarist for the supremely funky British band The New Mastersounds. His soaring hard-bop guitar playing complemented Soulive’s final tune of the set and the last track off the album, “Right On.”

The Shady Horns never seize to amaze me. I think this trio of Zoidis, Bloom and Casey may be my favorite. Special love for James because he was at our wedding and seems to be blowing up!!! ~ R.G.

“My favorite moment and also one of my favorite 2 Soulive songs ever is “Right On,” which I’m not sure I’ve ever heard them play. We watched Eddie staring at Krasno’s fingers for the first part of the song, and then both followed with dueling solos that crushed the crowd. As good as all that is, I’m reminded if what a genius Neal is holding bass line down with the left (hand) while soloing or laying down melodies with his right (hand).” ~ R.G.

Eddie Roberts: Photo Courtesy of Dani Barbieri

Eddie Roberts: Photo Courtesy of Dani Barbieri

The only song that wasn’t played from the album was Track 6, titled “Bitch-Ass Ho.” Considering that it’s a 23 minute track, that is probably why it was left off the first set.

“Bowlive kinda kicks of the festival season and spring off for us for the past 5 years. Watching them, I’m reminded of what truly gifted musicians they all are. The choice to play their first album was perfect and a punctuation to the obvious synergy these guys must have had since day one.” ~ R.G.

 Set Break

DJ Logic returned to the tables during set break and kept the energy level high for the audience. During this time, I generally like to take a walk around the venue and listen to the reactions of the audience. The buzz over the album was prevalent while many people were speaking individually about each artist or their favorite song. The Eddie Roberts sit-in had some audience members inquiring about the New Mastersounds. It was clear to me that the people in the audience were true fans, Soulive lovers and most of them men with bro-crushes on the band. Jen Durkin from Deep Banana Blackout was standing 20 feet away from me on the right while Basketball All-Star Cliff Robinson towered behind me most of the evening.

 Set II
Tuesday Night Squad
Don’t Change For Me
Gimmie A Sign
Layaway
Leave Me Alone

The second set started as simply as the first and with just as much energy. Eric, Neal and Alan took to the stage, joined by the Shady Horns and Nigel Hall for a fantastic rendition of “Tuesday Night Squad.” At one point during the song, Nigel got up from his keyboards, ran across the stage and jumped on the Clavinet with Neal Evans for a good 20 measures of excellent showmanship and musicianship. Talk about a highlight of the evening. The crowd went wild.

“I was mesmerized watching Neal and Nigel play the Hammond/bass keys together last night…they were having so much fun!! and the antics/keyboard trickery it was like a choreographed dance between two ridiculously amazing boards men – ducking under each other’s arm, jumping back and forth with their hands. Yeah, it was something fierce.” ~ A.R.

“Nigel getting up from the keyboard second set to lead the crowd was awesome.” ~ L.H.

“The hottest moment if the night was Neal and Nigel switching positions on the keys while never missing a note in the bass line!!! SUPER HOT AND ENTERTAINING!!!!” ~ R.G.

Eddie Roberts: Photo Courtesy of Dani Barbieri

Eddie Roberts: Photo Courtesy of Dani Barbieri

Nigel’s smooth voice overtook us with “Don’t Change For Me,” a bluesy tune that had Krasno’s guitar strumming along sweetly in our ears. At one point, Nigel was on the ground, on his knees, singing directly to the lucky folks in the front row. His signature soulful scream resonating throughout the crowd, as we all melted into his vibe.

Nigel Hall’s original tune, “Gimmie A Sign” was next. He spoke about the new Brooklyn Bowl Vegas and how much he loved it there but how the original Brooklyn Bowl will always be home. This proclamation extended to Soulive as they have played The Brooklyn Bowl more times then any other group, while Krasno has played the Bowl more then any other artist.

When The Root’s drummer, Questlove, walked on stage for “Layaway,” Nigel’s latest musical creation, the audience went wild. Alan Evans moved to vocals while Questlove added his signature groove to the song. Questlove has a standing DJ gig every Thursday at the Brooklyn Bowl. If you are ever in the area, bring your dancing shoes because his long-standing set is one of the hottest dance parties in the city.

The entire night, Adam “Shmeeans” Smirnoff (Lettuce) had been hanging in the wings, looking sharp in his suit. We all wondered when we would get a chance to hear this amazing guitarist and “Leave Me Alone” gave us that chance. We now had a slew of amazing musicians on stage and the sound was so tight. Nigel asked Shmeens to “tell us a little bit about yourself” and with that, Schmeens went into a disgustingly rich, hearty guitar solo. Eric Krasno beamed at Schmeens as he played, recognizing the hotness we were being delivered through his strings.

“Any night that you get to see Shmeeans, Kraz and Eddie Roberts play together in a show is funk guitar at its best. All three are so amazing in their own way. Kras crushing leads, Shmeeans playing rhythm guitar timed to the perfection of a Swiss watch, and Eddie Roberts who swings back and forth between amazing leads and perfect rhythm. For us guitar heads, it was a night to remember.” ~ J.R.

Encore: James Brown Medley
Lickin Stick
There Was A Time

For the encore, Soulive, Nigel Hall, The Shady Horns and DJ Logic delivered a rousing James Brown medley of “Lickin Stick” into “There Was A Time.” Alan Evans continued holding down the beat on the drums while his brother, Neal, slayed the keys. This brotherly duo demonstrates quality, seasoned musicianship with every note they drop.

“The James Brown Medley was this band at its finest. So good, so tight and they played so well with each other.” ~ G.F.

“Last night was one of my most favorite Bowlive ever. The vibe in the bowl was magical and everybody was really into it. I can’t wait for tonight!! Always great to hang! George matters and bring Nigel back on stage!! He was so happy last night!” ~ L.H.

With out a doubt, Neal Evans, Alan Evans and Eric Krasno enjoyed the first night of their milestone fifth year of Bowlive. We all did. I pray every year that they will come out with a DVD of these adventurous nights of music simply because no words do justice to the energy and animation of these three wonderful men. Three wonderful men who have created a treasured event based around love, music and friendship.

Tonight’s Special Guests will be the famous funky bassist from The Meters, Mr. George Porter, Jr. and Leroy Justice will open at 8:30 pm

On to the next one….. 🙂

List of Special Guests and Openers:

THURSDAY MARCH 13 – Special Guest: NIGEL HALL

FRIDAY MARCH 14 – Special Guests: GEORGE PORTER JR. & SPECIAL GUESTS TBA
Opener: LEROY JUSTICE

SATURDAY MARCH 15 – Special Guest: GEORGE PORTER JR. feat. a special LONDON SOULIVE joint set
Opener: THE LONDON SOULS

TUESDAY MARCH 18 – Special Guest: JOHN SCOFIELD
Opener: & Special Guest: JON CLEARY

WEDNESAY MARCH 19 – Special Guests: JOE RUSSO & BILL EVANS
Opener & Special Guest: JON CLEARY

THURSDAY MARCH 20 – Special Guest: DMC (of RUN DMC)
Opener: ALAN EVANS TRIO

FRIDAY MARCH 21 – Special Guest: MARCO BENEVENTO
Opener: SONYA KITCHELL

SATURDAY MARCH 22 – Special Guest: BILL EVANS
Opener: WOLF! Featuring Scott Metzger

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Bowlive III: Night Ten – Finale Recap for Soulive w/ Ledisi, Derek Trucks and The London Souls ~ Extended Review + Media (03.10.12)

After nine nights of warming up, Soulive members Eric KransoNeal Evans and Alan Evans tore the roof off the Brooklyn Bowl Saturday night for the final night of their 3rd annual ten-night residency, Bowlive. Over the course of the last two weeks, Soulive presented their audience with talented guests from across the musical spectrum. Virtuoso guitarists such as jazz legend John Scofield, southern blues rocker Luther Dickinson (North Mississippi Allstars), and the hard-bopping Warner Brothers artist Mark Whitfield created slaying duets with guitarist Eric Krasno. Renowned bassists Oteil Burbridge (The Allman Brothers Band) and George Porter, Jr. (The Meters) rocked the stage, adding to the cool bass keys Neal Evans plays so strikingly. Hip-hop drummer ?uestlove (The Roots), experimental percussionist Billy Martin (MMW) and world beat drummer Luke Quaranta took their turns leading the rhythm when the smoother than smooth Soulive drummer Alan Evans stepped aside to play rhythm guitar.

Guest vocalists Nigel Hall, Allen Stone, Jennifer Hartswick and Alecia Chakour brought their own style of strength and soul to the mic, Citizen Cope and Alice Smith sang an eclectic mix of blues, laid-back rock and folk while Rhazel and Ledisi delivered beat boxing and R&B/Soul into the eager ears of their audience. As well, for two night and two full sets, Royal Family recordings artists Lettuce, consisting of guitarist Adam Smirnoff, drummer Adam Deitch (Break Science), bassist ED “Jesus” Coomes, and The Bowlive horns, seared the stage with their urban funk flavor.

The Bowlive Horns, consisting of saxophonist James Casey, trumpeters Eric Bloom and Matt Owens and tenor saxophonist Ryan Zoidis were joined over the course of the run by numerous big name brass players.  Trombonist Sam “Big Sam” Williams (Big Sam’s Funky Nation), flautist/saxophonist Karl Denson (Karl Denson’s Tiny Universe), trumpeters Rashawn Ross (Dave Matthews Band) and Jennifer Hartswick, flautist Kofi Burbrudge (Derek Trucks Band) and wild improvisational saxophonist Skerik, rotated throughout the ten nights creating one of the sickest brass ensembles some have ever seen.

Other surprise guests included virtuoso pianist Eldar and organist Mitch Chakour while DJ Wyllys spun the ones and twos in between the weekend sets. When Soulive didn’t open the show themselves, the one man band, Zach Deputy, Royal Family recording artists The Nigel Hall Band, The Alecia Chakour Band and The London Souls amped the energy of the evening before Soulive took over to lay devastation upon the stage. It has been a two week rage of full on face melting, mind warping, soul filling, gut busting musicianship that accelerated with power each night and with audience members wondering how it could be topped.

Saturday night was the tenth and last night of Bowlive III. The audience, clad in white outfits for the evening’s White-Out Party theme, could be heard whispering their ideas of who the special guests might be. The London Souls, Ledisi and The Royal Family All-Stars were billed which could only mean that a surprise that couldn’t be named was being prepared.

The London Souls opened the evening with their Hendrix-style rock and roll sound. It is quite impossible to remain calm when guitarist Tash Neal, bassist Stu Mahan, and drummer Chris St. Hilaire are slamming away on their instruments.  The perfect opening for the end of a great run.

Soulive’s set started off with the super horn heavy, high-energy “El Ron”  However, during “Upright,” some unexpected technical difficulty occurred.  What could have been a rough moment turned into something special. There was three minutes where Alan Evans and his team worked at lightning speed to repair a broken drum head while the remaining members on stage worked together to keep the audience engaged. The audience clapped and cheered, supporting their favorite trio because there was importance in this moment. The band’s talent was exposed so much more during this time as they kept it together. The power from the applause in the audience when Evans’ silver shimmering drum kit was finally lifted in the air and put back in place was outstanding. It was a killer moment in rock n roll, a killer moment in Bowlive History. The trio ripped into the end of “Upright” and kept the momentum UP, UP, UP! They rolled through “Tuesday Night Squad” and Nigel Hall sang on the lively “Too Much” and the beautifully arranged “Everybody Wants to Rule the World” by Tears For Fears that segued into Bobby Caldwell’s “Open Your Eyes.”

When Ledisi was brought back on stage for the second night, the crowd exploded. Her R&B flavor had brought such joy to the previous night’s performance and we wanted more. Singing “Love Never Changes” off her Turn Me Loose album, Ledisi unleashed her massively powerful voice upon the audience. Her range and strength were unbelievable as she swiftly scatted her way through “Them Changes,” a Buddy Miles cover off of Jimi Hendrix’s Band of Gypsys. Tash Neal also performed on this song where he and Krasno playfully raged a duet to end the set.

The second set began as multiple white balloons were tossed out into the audience while Soulive played “One in Seven.” The second technical difficulty of the night occurred as Neal Evans’ clavinet finally gave way after nine nights of solid pounding. Not to miss a beat, Alan Evans began jamming on his kit, delivering a tight an extended drum solo as the back line team fixed the issue.  It was then time for some Beatles love as they played an electric run of “Eleanor Rigby,” “She’s So Heavy” and “Get Back.”

Finally, the last surprise guest of this amazing musical journey was invited on the stage. Southern rock, slide guitarist Derek Trucks (The Allman Brothers Band) walked out on stage with Nigel Hall and Ledisi to perform Sam Cooke’s Civil Rights Era anthem “A Change Gonna Come,”. It was no wonder that while Ledisi and Hall sang with all their passion and Derek Trucks made his guitar cry, audience members began to weep where they stood. The meaning and epic delivery of this song wasn’t lost on a single soul. Soulive flipped the emotional script by following Cooke’s song with the raging Jimi Hendrix’s tune, “Manic Depression!” Derek Trucks, Eric Krasno, Neal Evans and Alan Evans delivered a sick rendition of the song with Trucks and Krasno playing off each other and Trucks taking a ripping solo to end the set.

Before the encore, Brooklyn Bowl owner, Pete Shapiro, came on stage with Rosemary and Lavender plants in his hands. He explained that everyone on the floor was to take a piece of the plants being passed around the audience in hopes that the aroma therapy would help us gather our strength for one last song. Ending their epic ten night run the way they began, our favorite trio, just the three of them, took the stage for “Aladdin.”

Bowlive III is now over, leaving some New Yorkers wondering what to do with themselves.  For two weeks, dedicated fans came to the Brooklyn Bowl to see Neal Evans, Alan Evans and Eric Krasno play their hearts out, touching on every musical genre and playing with many of Americas most talented musicians. Let us give thanks to Soulive for the dedication to their craft and their ability to express it through the creative outlet that is Bowlive. Thanks for their want to educate us on new talent, their need to put new twists on old classics, and their determination to raise the bar each and every night.

Let us give thanks to The Brooklyn Bowl, because without them there would be no Bowlive. Thanks for their wonderful environment, staff and treatment.  For the last 2 weeks the Brooklyn Bowl has been our community’s second home. We’ve feasted on their fantastic Blue Ribbon cuisine, felt at home on their plush leather couches and enjoyed their attentive staff.   Soulive + The Brooklyn Bowl = Bowlive and don’t you forget it!

A change has come to New York City. A change has come to the music community.  Soulive has created something so special in Bowlive.  There is nothing else like it in our scene and it’s through that unique way of doing things that Soulive will remain one of the most influential groups in our music community. Bowlive is the development of a passionate dream that is now reality. After three years, Bowlive is no-doubt a game changer in the music community and will continue to be for many years to come. Thank you Soulive!

 Karen E. Dugan
– Photo courtesy of Phrazz

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Bowlive III: Night Nine – Soulive w/ George Porter Jr., Ledisi and Skerik ~ Extended Review + Media (03.09.12): Bowlive Finale White Party Ledisi, The London Souls, and The Royal Family All-Stars TONIGHT!

Fire! Fire! Fire! These three little words are the simplest yet perfect definition of what occurred on the Brooklyn Bowl‘s stage last night for the ninth night of Soulive’s third annual ten night residency, Bowlive. So far, nine epically diverse nights of music have now been devoured by sold-out crowds of rabid NY music fans. The members of Soulive, the amazing Neal Evans on organ and bass keys, Eric Krasno, and the backbone of it all, Alan Evans on drums, were back at it for the last weekend of this fantastic run. After eight nights of raging musical collaborations, Soulive continued to deliver with an onslaught of some of America’s most influential musicians. The members of Soulive, The Bowlive Horns, George Porter, Jr., Eldar, Ledisi, Mark Whitfield, Nigel Hall and Alecia Chakour invested all their energy into making last night’s audience react just as powerfully as these musicians performed.

Last night’s opening act is one of the newest musical collaborations within the Royal Family. Nigel Hall and Alecia Chakour took to the stage with a “little help from their friends” to deliver a set of beautifully arranged classics.  These soul-filled vocalists are being compared to some of the greatest soul singing duos of our era and deserve all the love and recognition that comes their way. Supporting their slow, soulful vibe was drummer Adam Deitch (Break Science), trumpeter Eric Bloom (Diana Birch), guitarist Adam Smirnoff (Lettuce), saxophonist James Casey (6figures), Ryan Zoidis (Lettuce), and Alecia Chakour’s brother, bassist Alex Chakour. Nigel Hall sat behind his Rhodes keyboard while Alecia dominated the crowds command from the front of the stage. Performing such classics as Stevie Wonder’s “Signed, Sealed, Delivered” and The Righteous Brothers’ “You’ve Lost That Loving Feeling,” Hall and Chakour made the music their own with beautifully blended voices and arrangements of the songs. These two voices were meant to find each other and the audience couldn’t have been more invested in the harmonies and beauty resonating between them. Pure soul perfection. Keeping with the “Family Affair,” Mitch Chakour, Alecia and Alex’s father, was invited on stage to play keys for Joe Cocker’s “With a Little Help From my Friends!” When Nigel Hall and Alecia Chakour join forces on stage, their bond through music and their passion for soul pours out of them. This was only the second time the duo had performed as an organized set all their own and fans can be sure that it will not be their last. There is magic in this musical union that doesn’t come around often.

After such an touching set, NY-bsed DJ, Wyllys, spun on the 1’s and 2’s to keep the crowds elevated before Soulive took to the stage. When Soulive finally hit, they came out blasting with “Steppin.” This was the final weekend of Bowlive and the trio, who have been delivering us powerful sets for two weeks, raised their own bar a little higher.  After the short set with George Porter Jr. (The Meters) the previous night, Soulive jumped right into the second song by inviting New Orleans funkiest bassist back out on stage for “Pungee” and “Need More Time.” There is an energy that George Porter, Jr. brings to a stage that is tangible. Nigel Hall was back to join Porter for “Leave Me Alone,” but not before Nigel bowed at Porter’s feet letting the crowd know that this “was the funkiest black man in the universe!”

When special guest New Orleans singer-songwriter Ledisi was announced, the venue erupted. This portion of the set was so smokin’ that heat was rising from the stage. Performing “Knocking,” with Adam Deitch now on drums, Ledisi wowed the crowd with her powerful, demanding vocals and sensual style. There is no doubt that she deserves the multiple Grammy nominations that have come her way in the past few years as this was the definition of pure entertainment. “Chain of Fools” followed with The Bowlive Horns, Porter, and a surprise sit-in by Eldar, a fellow Grammy nominated pianist and composer. Surely one of the hottest portion of the night, confirmed by the buzz heard through the audience, Eldar delivered a complex piano solo while Ledisi scatted atop his gorgeous improvisational composition.  George Porter Jr. and the remaining musicians on stage supported this musical bliss to end one of the most magnificent sets of the run. Ledisi’s vocals supported by George Porter Jr. funky bass and combined with the jazzy vibe from Soulive and surprise guest Eldar was truly inspirational, uplifting and touched the audience’s soul. This is what Bowlive is all about, the deliverance of truly developed artists who are masters at their craft!!

Wyllys was spinning again for set break. Never using a set list, Wyllys kept the energy UP with choice selections of funk, R&B, and soul tunes. He kept the crowd dancing before Soulive came back for “Cannonball” supported by the Bowlive Horns. Always ready for something special and new, Soulive invited hard bop jazz guitarist Mark Whitfield on stage next for an electric rendition of George Benson’s “World is a Ghetto.” Following this amazing sit-in, George Porter, Jr. came back on stage and took the lead for the rest of the night performing multiple tunes from The Meters catalog, “Funky Miracle,” “The Dragon,” “People Say,” and “Ain’t No Use.”  The consistent funky bass lines and powerful, invested vocals coming from Porter during these selections fueled the set as well as the musicians sharing the stage. They were long arrangements making room for each artist to share their talent with rousing solos and epic extended jams. Tears were in the eyes of their audience as Eric Krasno and friends ended the set with a stunning, gorgeous arrangement of “Out in the Country.”


There are some music performances that are simply impossible to describe with words. Last night was one of those nights and any attempt at doing justice through written word seems unfulfilling after witnessing the magic of last night. The musical genius that poured off the stage resulted in emotional ballads and extended improvisational jams that expanded on the already amazing two weeks that Soulive has provided it’s audience. It’s painful to even imagine that this adventure is coming to an end. However, we still have one night!  A single night to enjoy one of the sickest musical residencies to happen to our musical community. Every night Soulive has stepped up their game, tightened their sound, and put together an arsenal of talented musicians to play some of the greatest songs ever written.  Tonight, Soulive invites Ledisi, The London Souls, and the Royal Family All-Stars to close out the residency. You can expect nothing but pure gold this evening as these boys will surely be going out with a bang! 

 Karen E. Dugan

– Photo courtesy of Marc Millman

*To see photos of these musicians and lots of other live music, please check out: http://www.marcmillmanphotos.com/music

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Bowlive III: Night Eight – Soulive w/ George Porter Jr., Zach Deputy, Citizen Cope and Alice Smith ~ Extended Review + Media (03.08.12)

For the eighth night, Soulive members, Eric Krasno, Alan Evans and Neal Evans, performed at the Brooklyn Bowl for their annual residency, Bowlive.  In its third year, Bowlive has become one of the most interesting, engaging, educational and smoking residencies in New York City. There are some, who might argue, in America. Each night has gotten heavier, deeper, tighter, and energetically more invested with each guest who joins the stage to breath more life into the already amazing trio.

The Alecia Chakour Band opened last night to a huge crowd. Chakour joined the Bowlive rooster last year.  In the masculine crew that makes up the artists on the Royal Family Records Label, Alecia Chakour is a breath of fresh female energy. With a voice and range as powerful as Aretha Franklin, Chakour rightful deserves to be on stage with the talented musicians who make up Soulive. Chakour’s band members consisted of trumpeter Igmar Thomas (The Cypher), organist Neal Evans (Soulive), bassist and brother Alex Chakour, drummer Miles Arntzen (Antibalas), guitarist Sam Cohen (Apollo Sunshine), and saxophonist James Casey (6figures).  A highlight was when surprise guest artist Kofi Burbridge (The Derek Trucks band) lent his fluttering flute to the bunch on their new tune, “Surely.” The Alecia Chakour Band is a sick, tight, funky crew who fit right into the rotation of amazing acts that we have so far seen over the two week run.

Soulive members (guitarist Eric Krasno and soul brothers Alan Evans on drums and Neal Evans on clavinet) welcomed numerous guests on stage last night, some announced and some a surprise. This is always to be expected and they never disappoint. “Steppin” was the only song Soulive ever stood alone on stage for. After that, the flood gates opened with Kofi Burbridge jumping in on “El Ron” with the Bowlive Horns: saxophonist James Casey, trumpeter Eric Bloom and tenor saxophonist Ryan Zoidis. Special guest and Brooklyn resident Citizen Cope was next to join the stage to perform his original “Bullet and a Target,” and “Something to Believe In.” Cope’s raw, uncommon chords and proactive lyrics have been recognized and covered by likes of Carlos Santana, Dido, Sheryl Crow and Slipknot. His vocals transformed the bowl into a new vibe, a slower yet passionate part of the set. Alice Smith, the second vocalist billed that night, joined for Cope’s last tunes, “Ain’t Gonna Stand for It” and “107 Degrees.” Alice Smith’s voice melded beautifully with Cope’s the same way that Alecia Chakour’s voice melds perfectly with Nigel Halls. She is aggressive, serious, powerful, and passionate with a 4-octave vocal range and stunning stage presence. Cope exited the stage and Alice Smith, with the Soulive trio backing her, performed Cee Lo Green’s, “Fool For You.” The Bowlive Horns helped closed out the set with “Tuesday Night Squad,”as trumpeter Eric Bloom’s excitement spilled out of his animated solo and Nigel Hall took over the keys.

The second set was dedicated exclusively to the musical power of New Orleans yet contained special guests of varying styles. This was definitely one of the best sets of the entire run. Special guests, world renowned New Orleans bassist George Porter, Jr. (The Meters), drummer ?uestlove (The Roots), Billy Martin (Martin, Medeski and Wood), flautistKofi Burbridge and saxophonist Skerik, out for his third night, piled on stage with Soulive and the Bowlive horns. Covering New Orleans and Meters favorites “Just Kissed My Baby, “Hey Pocky Way,” “Come Fly with Me,” and “Funkify Your Life,” the musical entourage on stage was the definition of a Jam Room. George Porter, Jr. brought such life to the younger musicians who were surrounding him. Each artist took their turn power housing their instruments because Porter believes in the journey of the song and allowing it to unfold, which is exactly what happened on “Africa,” when Skerik took his solo and the classic song turned into a completely different creature.

Experimental jazz percussionist Billy Martin was left to his own devices with a pile of instruments to create sounds with after drumming for “Hey Pokey Way.” Martin is the drumming member of his own jazz, funk trio so his addition to Soulive allowed for experimental sounds that enhanced the layers of the music. “Everything is Everything” closed the set with Nigel Hall on vocals and another night of Bowlive ended, this time without and encore.  ?uestlove’s Bowl Train DJ set saw out the rest of  the night and everyone danced their way through funky, old skool tunes until their weary bodies said enough.


It’s unbelievable to think that the members of Soulive have been going full speed for eight crazy nights. What a testament to their level of stamina, creativity, and their ability to surprise and entice their audience.  For those who can’t make the last two nights, check out the live feed on iClips.net. For those of you with the ability to make it this weekend, you won’t be disappointed. Continuing his New Orleans flavor from last night, special guest George Porter Jr. will be joined by Ledisi with Nigel Hall and Alecia Chakour opening. We can only speculate who the surprise guests will be, but you can be sure they will bring in Bowlive’s final weekend in FULL RAGE!!!

BUY SINGLE DAY TICKETS NOW!
Can’t make the LIVE RAGE? Stream It on iClips.net!

 Karen E. Dugan
– Photo courtesy of Phrazz

Youtube Videos

Soulive feat. Citizen Cope – “Bullet & a Target” : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hoFGGhF_z2s

Soulive feat. George Porter & Nigel Hall – “Come Fly Away” : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=azUKgsH7ztY

Soulive feat Alice Smith & Citizen Cope – “107 Degrees” : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HdVFSkp-YEg

Soulive feat. George Por ter, Nigel & Kofi – “Voices Inside” : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7cRBqKlyAHc

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Bowlive III: Night Seven – Soulive w/ Skerik, Kofi Burbridge & Lettuce ~ Extended Review + Media (03.07.12)

Zach Deputy opened night seven of Bowlive III with his Caribbean Ninja Soul flavor. His one-man-band sets always seem to force happiness out of the audience.  He is the purest definition of jolly as he sits behind a massive rig of equipment, creating and layering every element of his songs. Over the past two nights, Deputy has been throwing us all new tunes except for two different versions of “Lincoln Continental.” This would set a theme for a night of new tunes to be delivered by the members of Souilve, Lettuce and Alecia Chakour!

Experimental “saxophonic” saxophonist Skerik and the NY’s premiere urban funk band Lettuce continued into second night as special guests. However, following their formula of the previous week, Soulive guitarist Eric Krasno, organist Neal Evans and drummer Alan Evans initially hit the stage solo. Alan Evans dominated “Rudy’s Way” with his best drum solo of the run sending the audience UP!  A fixture of Bowlive since its inception, Kofi Burbridge of the Derek Trucks Band surprised the audience when he walked out on stage with his flute for “Cash’s Dream,” a warm, softening addition to such an organ-heavy song.

The Bowlive Horns, consisting of saxophonist James Casey (6figures), tenor saxophonist Ryan Zoidis (Lettuce), and trumpeters Eric Bloom (Diane Birch) and Rashawn Ross (The Dave Matthews Band) were next to join Soulive. Special guest Skerik completed the brass entourage and “Upright,” “Vapor” and “Flurries” delivered us a massively long horn-heavy rage. The various musicians on stage rotated solos starting with Skerik who inserted his wild element of experimental jazz while Rashawn Ross’s melting-pot experience defined his style per song. Everyone continued through the trio of songs jumping from tambourines to maracas and other various percussion instruments filling all voids with extremely tight and organized sound.  Special guest and opener Zach Deputy lead the stage for his original, “Thrill is Gone.” To see Deputy explore his guitar talents with a full band is quite a different experience. His sound completely changes because he isn’t worrying about layering the beats, the bass or the horns. The massive crew on stage closed the set with “Aladdin” and the always funky “El Ron.”

The entire Lettuce ensemble (The Bowlive Horns including Skerik, guitarists Eric Krasno and Adam Smirnoff, bassist ED “Jesus” Coomes, and drummer Adam Deitch) raged the stage for the second set kicking it off with “King of the Burgs.” Rashawn Ross lead with a killer trumpet solo while drummer Adam Deitch made his presence known after Alan Evan’s domination of the kit in the earlier set. Last night was an amazing night for drumming fans, to be sure. The funkiest band on the planet followed last night’s rage by releasing more new songs off their upcoming album to an eager, elevated crowd. On Tuesday night, we heard “Mean Fonk,” “Lettuce Play,” and the jokingly named tune “Brooklyn Bowler,” a word play on the wonderful venue housing Soulive’s ten-night residency and actually titled”Bowler,” reflecting organist Neal Evan’s signature hat. Last night the explosive audience members (and iClips.net online viewers) jumped and danced their bodies weary to new tunes, “Bump Tubby,” “Fast Kraz,” “Ghost of Jupiter,” and “New GoGo.” Alecia Chakour joined the stage for to sing the sultry “Do Ya Thing,” a first time cover for both Chakour and Lettuce. Flautist Kofi Burbridge played throughout the entire set while Skerik could be seen enjoying the set by the sound board. ED “Jesus” Coomes’ bass playing was a crucial element to the entire set as his glasses literally fogged up from the heat coming off his playing. Toubab Krewe’s Luke Quartana was back for a second night front and center on stage with his Djembe drum for “New GoGo,” while saxophonist James Caseyplayed the congas with drum sticks. Krasno was nowhere to be seen for this tune while the stage exploded into one of the sickest 11-piece percussion rages this super fan has had the privilege of watching. The amazing, soulful voice of Nigel Hall helped close the set with “Making my Way,” into a Curtis Mayfield medley of “We’re a Winner” and “Move on Up!”


Two nights into the second week and already we have had two surprise guests, Oteil and Kofi Burbridge, on top of the amazing special guests, Zach Deputy, Skierk and Lettuce. Soulive changes things up tonight with the invitation extended to Citizen Cope & Alice Smith, the legendary funk bassist George Porter, Jr. (The Meters), drummer Billy Martin (Martin, Medeski and Wood), Alecia Chakour Band, and ?uestlove (The Roots) on the 1’s and 2’s. RAGE!!

BUY SINGLE DAY TICKETS NOW!
Can’t make the LIVE RAGE? Stream It on iClips.net!

 Karen E. Dugan

YouTube Videos

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Night 6 Recap with Lettuce, Zach Deputy, Skerik, and Allen Stone :: Lettuce, Zach Deputy, and Skerik Tonight!

We have reached the second week of Soulive’s electric ten night Brooklyn Bowl Residency, Bowlive III. After two days of rest, drummer Alan Evans, organist Neal Evans and guitarist Eric Krasno were back for their sixth night, enlisting the help of guitarist Zach Deputy, vocalist Allen Stone, saxophonist Skerik and the funkiet group on the planet, Lettuce. There were also surprise sit-ins by percussionist Luke Quaranata (Toubab Krewe) and bassist Oteil Burbridge (The Allman Brothers Band). Whoa….

Last week, Soulive took on the responsibility of ripping open the stage themselves, proving that they don’t need anyone to help them stir the fire in our bellies. However, after a week of exhaustive musical deliverance, Soulive opted to let another wonderful musician lead the way with their first mid-week opener by way of Zach Deputy. Deputy describes his style as “Gospel, Ninja Soul.” He is a one-man band who sits behind a custom-made rig of electronics, computers, pedals, mics and various instruments to create a song which he delivers to the audience one layer at a time, looping his sounds to reach the end result.  The result being a complete song with beats, bass, lyrics, harmonies, and instrumental backups.  Aside from being fully invested in all aspects of his creativity, Zach Deputy is one of the kindest, accessible musicians on our scene. He adores his fans to a point that a lot of musicians do not.  Deputy spent the entire Soulive/Lettuce performance in the audience smiling and dancing away with the rest of us.

Soulive hit the stage to a sold-out venue warming up with “One in Seven” into “So Live.” Since Lettuce was in the house, Soulive invited out the horn section out for “Get Back.”  Saxophonist James Casey, tenor saxophonist Ryan “Zwad” Zoidis, and trumpeters Eric Bloom (Diane Birch) and Rashawn Ross (The Dave Matthews Band) lined up behind the trio, creating an intimidating wall of brass.  However, the audience erupted into frenzy when one of the sickest bassists on the planet, Oteil Bubridge, walked out to join the tune.  Oteil Burbridge is best known for his work with The Allman Brothers Band and his phenomenal scatting ability he delivers while playing some of the sickest bass lines you will ever hear. The addition of Oteil’s bass to the trio was a special treat. The Allman Brothers Band starts their ten-night residency at The Beacon Theater on March 9, 2012.

The deep and dirty “Hat Trick” continued with Oteil Burbridge on bass. The tight horn section became even more ridiculous with the addition of Seattle-based improvisational jazz saxophonist Skerik on “PJs”.  One name is all Skerik needs.  A founding member of such quirky jazz projects as Critters Buggin, Garage a Trois and Skerik’s Syncopated Taint Septet, his unique and wildly pioneering sound has been dubbed “saxophonics,” Skerik brought an element to the brass wall of horns that gave East Coasters a taste of that West Coast flavor.

For Granted” followed with a trumpet solo from Eric Bloom that stopped conversations and had eyes focused on the stage. Soulive then shifted gears by introducing the second Seattle-based special guest of the night, soul vocalist Allen Stone.  Our favorite trio was alone on stage to back Stone on his original “Unaware” Bowlive III audience members had not yet seen a voice of this nature on stage. Even though the energy lowered due to the softness of the song, Stone’s smooth falsetto was absolutely captivating and all eyes were on him by the time he belted out “Mary” and “Love and Happiness” to end the diverse and fulfilling musical set.

The second set was just a full rage by Lettuce, the greatest urban-flavored funk band in America.  The stage swelled as Lettuce’s horn section, comprised of saxophonist James Casey, tenor saxophonist Ryan “Zwad” Zoidis, and trumpeters Eric Bloom (Diane Birch) and Rashawn Ross (The Dave Matthews Band) came back on.  Alan Evans, who had held down the dirty drums all night, was replaced by Adam Deitch (Break Science). Krasno was joined on rhythm guitar by Adam “DJ Schmeeans” Smirnoff and energetic bassist ED “Jesus” Coomes set up center stage. Vocalist Nigel Hall grabbed the microphone and they kicked off the hot set with some love to Bootsy Collins as he shouted “We Like To Party!”  Lettuce performed tunes off their old catalog but it was when new song “Bowler” and “Madison Square” that the audience gave the most love to the artists on stage.  “Madison Square” is currently the song the NY Knicks are using as their theme song. The Brooklyn Bowl went wild as Skerik jumped in and out of songs with his wild musical antics and Luke Quaranata (Toubab Krewe) ending the set with a killer rendition of “Squad Live.”


The party continues tonight with the same special guests. And who knows, with the energy rising each night and more and more musical guests seen wandering the bowling lanes, you can be sure that more artists will be gracing the Bowlive stage then are billed.

 Karen E. Dugan

Youtube Videos

Soulive w/ Allen Stone – “Love And Happiness” : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g9n8k0vkPNc

Soulive w/Allen Stone – “Mary” : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4B45uPhn_oo

Lettuce – Ryan Zoidis sax solo : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fa1i-ZUjo_g

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Bowlive III: Soulive Kid Rocker’s Bowl and Night Five w/Marco Benevento and Jennifer Harstwisk @ The Brooklyn Bowl ~ Extended Review + Media (03.03.12)

Saturday afternoon at the Brooklyn Bowl, Soulive participated in their first Kids Rockers Bowl, an annual event for all ages held in various venues around the nation. Craig Baldoand Rober Hailes hosted the show, designed to bring families together to experience engaging artists and comedians. There was a joking banter between the hosts and the audience before they invited children on stage to sing a few songs of their choice. The children sang “Twinkle, Twinkle,” “Sesame Street,” and there was even an original composition sung by the adorable 4 year old Maxamillion to the tune of ABC’s that he wrote for his mother.

Eventually, Soulive, comprised of guitarist Eric Krasno, drummer Alan Evans and organist Neal Evans, came out and the party got started as they performed “So Live.”  Kid Rockers artists generally play original compositions for the adults allowing the children to “just rage” as explained by the hosts.   Karl Denson joined the stage for “Turn it Out” while little ones played Twister on the dance floor, bowled and ate the Brooklyn Bowl’s amazing Mac and Cheese! Nigel Hall came out for the remainder of the set for “Too Much,” Michael Jackson’s “I Can’t Help It,” and finally Hall’s original, “Gimmie A Sign.” Throughout the songs, Hall altered the lyrics for the children singing positive life lessons about sharing, not needing multiple pieces of candy and playing nicely. The entire show was totally amusing.

It was such a different experience seeing children of all ages running around, screaming, blowing bubbles, playing Keep Away with balloons and engaging in a band their parents love. There were children on stage with maracas and dancing all around the speakers.  At the end of the set, Soulive had a question/answer segment. Various children asked the band members about their favorite song (no one could give a real answer); if they enjoyed Jam Cruise (wonderful responses from the band on this one) and other fun questions.

It must be mentioned that the most beautiful part of this afternoon performance was that after years of attending live shows with your various music loving friends, the ability to get to know their children bridged a social gap in Soulive’s fan base.  Our children created new friendships and play dates were scheduled. Our children were involved in a band their parents loved and new generations of fans were groomed to follow in our footsteps! It was a beautiful thing but the party wasn’t over yet. Fans headed home to rest up, pass their children to a babysitter and head back to the Brooklyn Bowl for the last evening show of the first week run. Marco Benevento and Jennifer Hartswick were the special guests for the evening.

Saturday night was the first night Bowlive scheduled an opener. The Nigel Hall Bandspilled out on the stage around 8:45pm to an unusually early packed house. Hall had quite the entourage! Following keyboardist, vocalist and band leader Nigel Hall on stage was back-up vocalists Alecia Chakour (The Warren Haynes Band) and Mel Flannery (Mel Flannery Trucking Co.), saxophonist James Casey (6Figures), guitarist Adam Smirnoff(Lettuce), trumpeter and vocalist Jennifer Hartswick (Trey Anastasio Band), trumpeterMatt Owen (Tim Blane Band) and Eric Krasno played bass while Neal Evans played his tri-level keyboard rig. The newest addition to the Hall line-up was Louis Cato (6Figures, Marcus Miller, Brian McKnight) who replaced Adam Deitch (BreakScience) on drums for the evening.

The massive group on stage warmed up with “Hang It Up” followed by “Baby I’m Coming Home” where Nigel pulled out a solo on his Moog that easily showed how much his talent has grown since touring with The Warren Haynes Band this past summer. “Never Know” was next with Adam Smirnoff kicking off the first shredding guitar solo of the night into “Never Gonna Let You Go.” Saturday night’s audience also got to hear Hall’s latest composition titled “Try,” a song that delivers a firm message to get your life together.  The soulful vocals of Mel Flannery, Alecia Chakour and Jennifer Hartswick were phenomenal and flowed seamlessly into Nigel’s vocals which are an integral part of his tight, soulful and romantic sound. Hall ended his set with “Too Sweet” and “Gimmie A Sign,” this time leaving the adult lyrics intact and garnering a shouting applause.

Soulive’s first set started out with the trio continuing off the high-energy from Nigel’s set with “Outrage” and “Bubble,” both from their 2007 album No Place Like Soul. Special guest vocalist Jennifer Hartswick joined the stage with her trumpet along with James Casey and Matt Owen for the horn-heavy “Vapor,” a tune which Soulive audiences rarely see performed live unless there is a trumpet present.

The evening’s second special guest, experimental pianist/organist Marco Benenvento, entered the stage next, playing on “Hat Trick.” James Casey delivered, yet again, a fiery saxophone solo that had audience members shouting at the top of their lungs and the female potency given off by Jennifer Hartswick was comforting.  There aren’t many female musicians that can live up to the standards that the male members of Soulive demand so to see Jennifer Hartswick dominating the stage this weekend was a real treat. It just got better and better as she came to the front of the stage and displayed her powerhouse vocals for Ray Charles’s “Drown in My Tears.” This led into The Beatles “Revolution,” where Marco Benevento was allowed to shine and completely own the stage.  Neal Evans and Benevento were left alone to enjoy a duet that became a trippy, psychedelic trance as they played off each other. A beautiful part of Bowlive is hearing your favorite Soulive tunes grow into something new based on the special guests joining with their personal musical influence. The experimental jazz style of Benevento against Neal Evans’ heavy-handed deep organ was fantastic and even though it was jazzy, it didn’t lighten the intensity of the song one bit, it was simply enhanced.

The second set started around midnight with a few more original compositions by Soulive. At the end of “Uncle Jr.,”   Alan Evans invited drummer/bassist Louis Cato to the stage. Alan moved to a guitar while Cato played the drums for Jimi Hendrix’s “Manic Depression,” an absolute gem of a cover.  Cato, who has extensive talent playing the bass and drums, crushed a drum solo so intense that drum sticks were left broken and if the audience had been sitting down, surely they would have stood for an ovation. Instead, they jumped in their standing positions and screamed praises at Cato who was humbly thankful.

The last few songs of the night ensured the explosive evening would be seared into our brains. The entire night had been one giant bowl (no pun intended) of high-energy music, vigorous dancing, cheek-breaking smiling and full-body raging. It was the weekend which brings high expectations and even though the musicians on stage brought just as much energy to this set as they had in the previous nights, the feedback from the sold-out crowd was entirely more powerful, allowing the musicians to engage in a deeper musical strength.  They ended the set with Hartswick gracing the stage for an AMAZING rendition of Led Zeppelin’s classic “Dazed and Confused!” Krasno and Marco Benevento absolutely tore this song up Jimmy Page style while Hartswick vocals sounded so smooth and sensual that both men and women were swooning. During the chorus, the musicians on stage fell into a mind-bending flow that helped everyone reach a musical hypnotic state.

The chosen tune for the encore cemented Saturday night as the best night of the run. This was made true by the epic song choices, the fact that the Brooklyn Bowl was sold out with rabid super fans and the fact that the musicians on stage were having such a blast. Soulive and their special guests ended the set with “The Ocean,” an instrumental Zepplin tune that showcased everyone’s amazing skill. Everyone knows that Led Zepplein is the ultimate rock band and you have to have some musical chops to even come close to reaching the height of what that song can become. Soulive and guests dripped with enthusiasm as they ended their night.


The first week of Bowlive III was intense, engaging and full of musical vitality.  Soulive began their run with guitarists John Scofield and Luther Dickinson, following with the funky Karl Denson, Big Sam and Rahzel, and ending with Jennifer Hartswick and Marco Benevento. Soulive fans experienced jazz, hip-hop, soul, funk, and psychedelic, experimental rock. The second week of Bowlive continues tomorrow night with special guests Skerik, Allen Stone and Zach Deputy. Let the party continue!

YOUTUBE VIDEOS

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